Saxophone Forum


by kd6tjc
(17 posts)
8 years ago

Looking for some blues solos for Alto or Tenor

Hello I would like to start off and say thanks for reading. Im looking for blues sax players that would be kind enough and share some solo blues tunes in sheet music form. Im not at transpose level as of yet working on it and find myself much interested in blues solos. Greatful to all that are kind enough to help a fellow sax play in his quest. my email is starband4u@yahoo.com

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  1. by walker5
    (2 posts)

    7 years ago

    Re: Looking for some blues solos for Alto or Tenor

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    1. by slowblow
      (1 post)

      7 years ago

      Re: Looking for some blues solos for Alto or Tenor

      Hi , I'm a relatively new player (2-years) can anybody suggest some nice easy slow solos ( blues or jazz )for alto sax Regards slowblow

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  2. by walker5
    (2 posts)

    7 years ago

    Re: Looking for some blues solos for Alto or Tenor

    yr

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  3. by irvkms
    (16 posts)

    7 years ago

    Re: Looking for some blues solos for Alto or Tenor

    From learning the hard (stubborn) way-Play along with slow blues. Playing transcribed solos can be frustrating because they may not sound bluesy enough without the rythm and chords. Just pklaying blues scales can get into the rut of root- flat 3-flat 5. It's surprising how many good blues use a major pentatonic so you get the 6th and 9th. Sil Austin and Lee Allen played in a basic style that I think is a good place to begin. Don't forget Lester Young, never wasted a note.

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  4. by swingstreet
    (315 posts)

    8 years ago

    Re: Looking for some blues solos for Alto or Tenor

    I would suggest that you get some Jamey Aeborsold play-a-long books w/CD's. They have plenty of blues, as well as everything else. It is like practicing with a rhythm section. If your local music store doesn't have them, then you can order them online.

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    1. by Stiles B
      (101 posts)

      8 years ago

      Re: Looking for some blues solos for Alto or Tenor

      Also get yourself a Charlie Parker Omnibook. Therein lies the answers ye seek.

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      1. by Sax Mom
        (964 posts)

        8 years ago

        Re: Looking for some blues solos for Alto or Tenor

        Grammer police!!! "Therein lie the answers ye seek." or "Therein lies the answer ye seek." giggle, giggle, giggle!!!

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        1. by jamterry
          (573 posts)

          8 years ago

          Re: Looking for some blues solos for Alto or Tenor

          Michelle let's go with grammar rather than grammer. I see this misspelling often.

          Reply To Post Yahoo! AIM ICQ


      2. by Jazz7
        (2 posts)

        8 years ago

        Re: Looking for some blues solos for Alto or Tenor

        I would like to start off and say thanks for reading. Im looking for blues sax players that would be kind enough and share some solo blues tunes in sheet music form. Im not at transpose level as of yet working on it and find myself much interested in blues solos. my email is alex-maria@supanet.com

        Reply To Post


        1. by blackfrancis
          (396 posts)

          8 years ago

          Re: Looking for some blues solos for Alto or Tenor

          In addition to reading the blues, LISTEN to the blues. Get the sound in your head and play from your heart. Not just sax players- any instrument (or vocal) will teach you something. Check out Sonny Criss on alto. A jazz player, but SO soulful.

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          1. by jazzears
            (12 posts)

            8 years ago

            Re: Looking for some blues solos for Alto or Tenor

            Get a copy of Ben Webster from the 'Storyville Masters of Jazz' series of albums. Listen to "Our Blues." The pace is unhurried. The changes are very easy to hear. Ben plays with great economy. By that, I mean that he doesn't throw a lot of notes at you. He hears wonderful melodic lines through the changes. He plays them at a comfortable pace. He phrases them with style and grace. He often comes down just behind the beat, which is very cool and interesting. I've been wearing this album out since I bought it a couple of weeks ago. I play along with it often. Mr. Webster has a lot to offer in terms of sheer expression. Once you get a few of his phrases in your head, you'll be amazed at what you can spin out of your own horn from there. Please understand this: I'm not suggesting that you become a copyist. I'm suggesting that you learn some of the phrases just for the sake of coming to an understanding that the notes don't have to be complicated. In fact, they can be very simple. After you've done that, let your imagination take you for a ride through the changes, and discover what you are inspired to play. You might surprise yourself! And after you've done that little exercise, there are a few hundred other examples out there for your listening inspiration. And I would add this, too: Don't limit your listening to sax solos. Listen to lots of expert soloists on a variety of instruments. I often catch myself emulating sax solo ideas on my guitar, and guitar solo ideas on my sax, etc. Trust your imagination, and then teach your fingers to land on the notes you're hearing in your head. You don't need sheet music transcriptions for that (although there is much to be learned from reading transcriptions). I play weekly (on rhythm guitar) with a tenor player who is ten times the musician that I am. He is very grounded in written music. He has a fine imagination, and a wonderful facility with his horn. But he has a hard time getting himself "off the page." Whenever he turns his back on his music stand, he plays like a monster! He is awesome. He just doesn't happen to be in a big comfort zone when he does that. He is so accustomed to the written page that it is almost like a crutch for him. He plays transcriptions frequently--as a means to learn how his favorite solos are structured. But when he gets off the page and plays from his guts...that's when I finally hear what he has been hearing inside his own head. My advice: Use transcriptions for what you can learn from them. Drill them. Then close the book, and close your eyes, And listen to the tune in your head. And just BLOW it! You will amaze yourself.

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            1. by swingstreet
              (315 posts)

              8 years ago

              Re: Looking for some blues solos for Alto or Tenor

              You know jazzears, one of these days I hope I have the opportunity to play some music with you. I like your thinking and your taste.

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            2. by spottspidermunki
              (55 posts)

              8 years ago

              Re: Looking for some blues solos for Alto or Tenor

              The posts above are Wonderful. Also, though, you might want to check out Hank Mobley's Soul Station album. Every single track on there is classic, and most contain some great blues licks. He is extremely under-rated. I attended Aebersold's jazz camp this summer, and almost every sax teacher was preaching the Soul Station album. There was hardly a faculty concert where one of those tunes wasn't played, but I digress.... Apart from listening, you might want to check out some Sonny Stitt transcriptions. They seem pretty available, and he plays both alto and tenor. He plays very much like Charlie Parker, but mostly not as quick (slow enough to glean some licks from). He also demonstrates lick-oriented playing. The Boss Tenors album is a great place to start listening to some quality Stitt.

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