Saxophone Forum


by pri_nce33
(7 posts)
8 years ago

lacquer

If I were to have the lacquer on my Selmer Balanced action taken what would that do to the sound of my horn? hear that the lacquer dampens some of the resonents of the horn. Would my horn still have the same life span that it would with out the lacquer?

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  1. by kneejerk52
    (397 posts)

    8 years ago

    Re: lacquer

    i removed the lacquer on my vito alto, can't honestly say i hear a difference. it will however tarnish without the lacquer on it. water, fingerprints everthing leaves marks and you have to buff it if you want it to look good, which does nothing for the sound. i don't know how it could shorten it's life span. it might however reduce it's value.

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    1. by bleeding gums
      (18 posts)

      8 years ago

      Re: lacquer

      removing lacquer absolutely reduces value

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  2. by swingstreet
    (315 posts)

    8 years ago

    Re: lacquer

    Lacquer doesn't affect the tone of the horn. Removing lacquer won't do a thing for it except speed up tarnishing and lower its resale value.

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  3. by Slausonm
    (51 posts)

    8 years ago

    Re: lacquer

    I've stripped lacquer on many different horns for people. I look at it this way: If the sound you make from your horn makes you $ and you like the way a similar horn sounds that has no lacquer, then go ahead and strip away. Unlacquered horns are ugly(to me) and they wear out faster. But if the sound is your goal and you don't mind that you are destroying a horn and will have to replace it...then go for it. Oh yea, if you are sensitive to heavy metals like brass and nickle having no lacquer will also affect you and probably the horn where you touch it.

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    1. by Linky
      (26 posts)

      8 years ago

      Re: lacquer

      Considering a saxophone doesn't ever resonate, there can be no dampening from it's finish. Also gives some thought to plating and lacquer finishes not affecting the sound in the slightest.

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      1. by Sax Mom
        (964 posts)

        8 years ago

        Re: lacquer

        What? By that logic, the whole saxophone could be made out of hard rubber, but I believe it might then sound like a cheap clarinet.

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        1. by swingstreet
          (315 posts)

          8 years ago

          Re: lacquer

          Sorry, but saxophones do resonate. Resonance is what determines the kind of tone an instrument produces.

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        2. by JaZzer
          (25 posts)

          8 years ago

          Re: lacquer

          I believe the idea of the change of sound with the removal of lacquer is more in the mind of the person who is concious of a lack of lacquer. Even if there was no difference, their mind would create one out of expectance. Perhaps it could change the sound on a particular note/horn. I personally wouldn't believe anything unless it's justified and from a credible source. All I do know is DON'T re-lacquer horns, and even worse-buffing them. I've seen way too many horns destroyed by people who don't take care of them, and then want them to look new. It's not removing lacquer that changes sound, it's buffing, and that doesn't particulary have a good effect on the sound. It's just removing metal from the horn.

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        3. by Slausonm
          (51 posts)

          8 years ago

          Re: lacquer

          jazzer, In an odd way we kind of agree. As a repairman, I've relauquered many horns. Done correctly it helps the horn. Not one horn that I have laquered has ever been perfect except for bad lacquer. They all have dents, dings, bent posts,bent keys, bad pads... If the horn were kept in perfect condition by the owners I wouldn't relaquer it either. Matt

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        4. by wls525
          (3 posts)

          7 years ago

          Re: lacquer

          I believe relacquering would be a poor choice. my selmer markvi has less than 20% and I sometimes wonder if a newer or fully lacquered horn would be more resonant?? sometimes I feel that i have to "muscle" the sound out and it doesn't bounce as I would like it to but then I play my wife's king super20 and it has no issues with bounce?? Here in STL I utilize the advice of Tim repairman up at St. Louis woodwind and brass..he sez to use Lemon Pledge every so often to keep the buildup to a minimum and also to keep the brass off of your fingers. A moderate amount on some paper towels and then elbow grease..It will take the greenish copper oxidation off. Off the recommendation of repairman Blaze down at Nottlemans music I used a product called Flitz to a high level of success. I removed that gooked up patina of many years to a healthy proper shine! supposedly flitz does not remove metal? I had poor luck replating a metal otto link. It lost many of the desirable qualities about it. A crying shame to ruin a vintage super tone master NY. I believe it was doing my health and fingertips no good though......

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