Saxophone Forum


by Friendly
(2 posts)
8 years ago

soft tonguing

Hello, I would like some advice about correctly notating tonguing. Sometimes I see a piece of flute, oboe, clarinet or bassoon music which features a single note repeated under a long slur with a tenuto symbol assigned to each note, suggesting so-called 'soft tonguing'. Does this type of notation apply to classical sax music, too? Do you see much of it in the classical sax literature? Thanks a lot, from Friendly.

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  1. by mjohnnie
    (66 posts)

    8 years ago

    Re: soft tonguing

    This figure was originally written for string instruments to indicate that with the slur, you keep the bow going the same way. The tenuto symbol means to put just a little more 'weight' on the note (easy to do for strings) while keeping the bow going the same direction. Now, just do whatever it takes to make that sound, and you'll have it:)

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    1. by Friendly
      (2 posts)

      8 years ago

      Re: soft tonguing

      Thanks, mjonnie, I agree with you about it being a string bowing notation (loure). As a composer, I am interested to know if sax players see that type of notation much in their sax parts. I am thinking of using it when composing for sax, but need to be sure that it is understood by sax players in general. Is it often seen in sax parts? Is it generally understood by sax players? Hope to hear from y'all... Thanks in advance:)

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      1. by Sax Mom
        (964 posts)

        8 years ago

        Re: soft tonguing

        I know I've seen it, for years! If you're not sure it will be understood, feel free to make a notation on the music, explaining your desire. I always found it helpful to have the composer's desire expressly noted.

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        1. by mjohnnie
          (66 posts)

          8 years ago

          Re: soft tonguing

          I had forgotten the name--loure--thanks for reminding me. Yes I've seen it many times. Saxmom has exactly the right idea. I compose a bit myself, so I had to learn all of the string things.

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