Saxophone Forum


by SaxAppeal
(67 posts)
8 years ago

Best Marching Horn

What's the best marching horn

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  1. by cuber
    (653 posts)

    7 years ago

    Re: Best Marching Horn

    the best marching horn is the absolute cheapest horn you can find, so you can put the money tword a good jazz horn worth playing

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  2. by newreedsyndrome
    (343 posts)

    8 years ago

    Re: Best Marching Horn

    That's sort of like, "What's the best brand of waste basket? And which one in their top of the line model?" A YAS23 or a Bundy is fine for that use. Anything that makes a noise and that you can play all the notes on will work.

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    1. by Sax Mom
      (964 posts)

      8 years ago

      Re: Best Marching Horn

      "Anything ... will work" Not really. There are some horns that are much more difficult to produce volume, and those would be less desirable for marching band. For that reason, an old student Conn might be a good choice, because they kick with volume.

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      1. by The Insomniac Saxman
        (141 posts)

        8 years ago

        Re: Best Marching Horn

        Back in my marching days some 20 years ago (am I that old now?!) I marched both a Bundy II and a YAS-23 (I would never have considered marching a pro horn, even for competition) . . . between the two, I preferred YAS-23 for comfort of the fingerboard as well as intonation.

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        1. by jaja999
          (15 posts)

          8 years ago

          Re: Best Marching Horn

          please just get a Yamaha 23. You won't be sorry.

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        2. by Dark Eyes
          (138 posts)

          8 years ago

          Re: Best Marching Horn

          Back when I was in marching band I played this one parade in weather that was around 10 degrees and my saxophone froze up. It wouldn't hardly play anything at all. Guess what sax it was? It was a yamaha. Point is that no horn is best for marching. Even in extreme weather a yamaha 23 will freeze. Just get one that can play all the notes and isn't missing a lyre hole, like my first sax was :-). And please, please don't spend a lot of money on a marching band horn because it will endure dings, scrapes, drops, and all other sorts of punishment (my section leader actually threw his sax across the field at us because we were goofing off and making him mad). Dark Eyes (unloved thesis)

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        3. by johnsonfromwisconsin
          (767 posts)

          8 years ago

          Re: Best Marching Horn

          I agree more with Dark Eyes. The Yamaha is nice, but is one of the more expensive student horns you'll find. I dont think much should be invested into marching equipment with the rain, the heat, dings on scatter drills, being placed down on the grass during rest, etc.

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      2. by sangreal
        (3 posts)

        8 years ago

        Re: Best Marching Horn

        I have two altos. The one I've been playing is Selmer 80 Series II alto. The second is my first sax which I bought new, a Conn 50 series student model made in 1964 which has been in the case unopened since 1967 when the teacher said I had graduated to a better horn. I also switched to tenor because I thought they looked cool. Since it had been in the case so long I was thinking a few weeks ago that it needed to be thrown out. But it looked fine, the lacquer was almost perfect. The only damage I could find was that the nickle silver keys had tarnished a bit. So I got some cork grease and a reed and started to play it. I don't know if the sax has changed or I have, but student 50 had a totally different tone as I remembered. It used to have a loud brassy wake up the neighbours tone and now it has an amazing mellow tone that stays the same from forte to piano, it was a delight to play. What's worse is that I can't reproduce the same on my Selmer Series 80, that cost mega bucks. What's more the dreaded high F sharp gave a better tone on the Conn than the Selmer. I am beginning to wonder if there really is that much difference between an expensive horn and a cheaper one? I don't pretend to be a great musician, I'm not, the Selmer was an ego buy. But the difference of tone between the two is so significant that everyone I've played both for prefer the tone of the 50 Conn.

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        1. by rachel92491
          (28 posts)

          8 years ago

          Re: Best Marching Horn

          i dont sugest the bundy II. mine atleast is tempermental(my section from my previous school called it the female horn=]- ) mayeb mine was just horrible abused before i got it bu seriously my bundy's second home is the repair shop. it has been overhauled(not the huge 900$ ones) like 3 time since i got it.

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          1. by mels
            (13 posts)

            8 years ago

            Re: Best Marching Horn

            For marching tenor, I bought a cheap one off eBay. It is definatly not the best horn in the world, the tone is gross, but it is loud. VERY loud. And i won't get too upset when it gets dented or rained on.

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          2. by sangreal
            (3 posts)

            7 years ago

            Re: Best Marching Horn

            Apparently Selmer and Selmer-Conn have a new beginner\ marching horn. I think Yamaha has the best quality student saxs by far, they border on intermediate for quality (Alto YAS 23??), but the price of the new Selmer is incredibly cheap (it's made in China). But if you have a son or daughter who wants to try the sax and you don't want to shell out a lot of $$$ for a new sax that might end up in the closet, it might be a good option. However it only came out two years ago and I could only find one review (positive, by a sax repair person in the UK). Anyway I tried to order one from the Selmer.com website and got redirected to an official distributor. If you do decide to gamble, it costs $450.00, be careful on the order page. It's defaulted to buy 5 saxs per order and I almost didn't notice. My high-end alto's pads look worn and I wanted a cheap back-up horn. I had an old Conn 50 as a back-up but the "see-saw" lever which switches the sax to the proper tone holes broke so both upper register tone holes open when I press the octive key. I haven't received the new student horn yet, so I have no idea if it will turn out to be a "you get what you pay for experience" or perhaps it is a good beginner horn that can help keep me in practice while my quality sax is in the shop. It's called the "Prelude."

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