Saxophone Forum


by Azsax
(47 posts)
7 years ago

bite plates on mouth pieces

I have a Vandoren V16 tenor pi

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  1. by sslavoix
    (32 posts)

    7 years ago

    Re: bite plates on mouth pieces

    go to a music store and ask them for a mouthpiece saver rubber that is what i use on ,my selmer s80 c* and my otto link 6* i love them they are like 5 or 6 dollars good luck!!!!!!

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    1. by Azsax
      (47 posts)

      7 years ago

      Re: bite plates on mouth pieces

      I was using one of those but i kept biting through that after about a week or so. I emailed Vandoren about it and a representative from DANSR got back with me. He asked that I send my address so they can send me a new bite plate free of charge. I just have to find a competent person to put it on. Pretty nice of Vandoren to send something out for free.

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      1. by newreedsyndrome
        (343 posts)

        7 years ago

        Re: bite plates on mouth pieces

        Yea, Vandoren's nice. Any guy at a repair shop would probably do it, or you could do it yourself. But maybe you want to look at the root of the problem. Are you using a tounge depressor of a reed? You reed size should be in the single digits. Perhaps you are biting too hard, especially if you work your way through mouthpiece patches.

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        1. by Azsax
          (47 posts)

          7 years ago

          Re: bite plates on mouth pieces

          i think it's the fact that one of front two teeth is slightly longer than the other one, so that one tooth takes the brunt of pressure. i use a size three reed.

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        2. by kneejerk52
          (397 posts)

          7 years ago

          Re: bite plates on mouth pieces

          this might sound crazy but i had one tooth slightly longer and actually sharper, my dentist just flatened it by grinding it off, otherwise it could have broken from being thin and sharp. i have not had the bite problem since.

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        3. by gtwright
          (5 posts)

          6 years ago

          bite pad creation

          The bite plate to use: 1) Go to Walmart 2) Get a bicycle inner tube, course sand paper and rubber cement or Crazy glue [2A) pay & go home] 3) Cut a bite pad out of the inner tube. Give it a round inch or so diameter DEPENDING ON THE MOUTHPIECE SIZE!! Don't make it huge on a soprano mpc. 4) Scratch up the mouthpiece bite area with sandpaper (to allow glue to stick). If this makes you nervous, stop now. 5) Using rubber cement, contact cement, Crazy Glue, etc (not Elmer's), glue the rubber pad onto the mouthpiece, centered around your tooth contact area. Careful - with Crazy Glue or contact cement, it has to be right at the first touch; no adjustments. Good luck. 6) Let it dry & you're done. Total cost -- Less than $10, right? Another thought: When my pad fell off (after 20 years on the mouthpiece) my first thought was, "Better bass response. I wish I'd had this in college." I left it off.

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        4. by STEVE GOODSON
          (291 posts)

          6 years ago

          Re: bite pad creation

          A rubber bite plate will never feel right and won't last. Try this: remove the old bite plate Get a black spray paint can top cut out a piece that fits Heat slightly so the fit is better Glue into place using E6000 glue Trim with a razor blade Smooth the edges with plastic polish

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        5. by JBTSAX
          (364 posts)

          6 years ago

          Re: bite pad creation

          I wonder if Thomas Bowles replaces his bite plate the same way?

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        6. by haduran
          (52 posts)

          6 years ago

          Re: bite pad creation

          I've found that a product called "shoe goo", designed to repair the worn soles on running shoes, works very well in this application. Available in black at many sporting shoe stores the stuff can, with masking if required, be carefully applied in exactly the area desired. After being allowed to thoroughly dry it can be sanded to preference though it tends to settle into a perfecdtly smooth surface when first applied. The stuff adheres very very well and, as you'd expect for something disigned to patch a shoe sole, is both resilient and cushiony and extremely durable. As an aside, I apologise to Saxquest's MRFIXIT and to SG for expressing what turned out to be unfounded misgivings in a public forum in reference to MRFIXIT's nom d' net.

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