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by Kitch22
(98 posts)
11 years ago

What are these: "~" (over a note)

What does it mean in jazz when a ~ is over a note?

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  1. by saxophoneplayingistight
    (13 posts)

    10 years ago

    Re: What are these: "~" (over a note)

    in classical music they are known as turns but in jazz there known as flips. for a flip u go up a minr third from thwe starting note and then go back to the original note down a half step and back to the original. FOr example if u started on D sharp you would go D sharp-F natural-D sharp-Dnatural-Dsharp

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  2. by sax_maniac
    (984 posts)

    11 years ago

    Re: What are these: "~" (over a note)

    I don't know if it's different in jazz, but in traditional music that symbol represents a "turn". In key of C or Am, a turn over a "C" note would be played as "C-D-C-B-C" within the designated time. In key of F or Dm, a turn over a "C" note would be played as "C-D-C-Bb-C".

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    1. by allaboutsax
      (7 posts)

      11 years ago

      Re: What are these: "~" (over a note)

      This is a turn usually played as a quick trill playing the root the whole step above unless otherwise notated by a natural, flat, or sharp sign above the turn sign. Th turn may be played 8th note triplet, dotted eight thirty seconds, or 16th note triplet depending on the situation

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  3. by weinscott
    (11 posts)

    11 years ago

    Re: What are these: "~" (over a note)

    It is a turn.
    The journey of 1,000 miles begins with a single step

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    1. by JaZzer
      (25 posts)

      11 years ago

      Re: What are these: "~" (over a note)

      It's a turn, but you can also call it a trill. In solos you can use it a lot for tension, but don't overdue, some things are good to repeat in solos, some aren't. Basically, if you have ~ over a E, Then it's E-F-E. Like a triplet, you just go a half-step up, and you have the trill/turn. Hope this helps.

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      1. by golferguy675
        (600 posts)

        11 years ago

        Re: What are these: "~" (over a note)

        Hey jazzer, I'm pretty sure you would play the note in the key signature. So you might not always just go up a half step. If F natural was in you're key, then it would be a half step, but say you were in the key of G or farther up the sharp major scales, then it would be E F# E. Correct me if I'm wrong. And no, it's not a trill dumbass. Totally different deal.

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        1. by Spike
          (248 posts)

          11 years ago

          Re: What are these: "~" (over a note)

          watch your language. and sometimes it does indicate a good spot for a trill. belive it or not, music is open to interpretation, and you have to know what fits best in a given situation.

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      2. by weinscott
        (11 posts)

        11 years ago

        Re: What are these: "~" (over a note)

        A trill is a totally different thing. You would also make the turn diatonic (in the key) unless it's marked otherwise.
        The journey of 1,000 miles begins with a single step

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        1. by silversax440
          (29 posts)

          11 years ago

          Re: What are these: "~" (over a note)

          Don't foget it depends on which way the turn is. If it is noted like it is on the keyboard of a computer you would go c, d, c, b, c and if the beginning of the shape goes down: c, b, c, d, c... And how these fit into the music depends on which direction the melody line is heading...

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        2. by SaxMan
          (559 posts)

          11 years ago

          Re: What are these: "~" (over a note)

          In music, we call it a Grapeto or somethign like that. you go up one, back to the note, down one and back up - never seen one in jazz before.

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        3. by Spike
          (248 posts)

          11 years ago

          Re: What are these: "~" (over a note)

          it's gruppeto, but yeah(haha, just trying to pick a fight) they're usually just played as a turn in jazz, and found comonly in latin music.

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        4. by golferguy675
          (600 posts)

          11 years ago

          Re: What are these: "~" (over a note)

          Yeah, well a turn is different in jazz than it is in classical. In classical playing, you would hit the note, go over, hit the note, go under it, then come back to the note again. Example:A B A G A and it has to fit in the given note value, it should be very quick. In Jazz however, you just hit the note, go above it, then come back to it. Example: ABA. The trick to this in jazz, sinced it is usually placed on an eigth note, you have to make it flow, so right when you come back to the original note, make sure you get back to the next eight note in time, and dont let it drag your time, or you'll get behind.

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        5. by wesmiller
          (55 posts)

          10 years ago

          Re: What are these: "~" (over a note)

          It's called an appogiatura.

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        6. by silversax440
          (29 posts)

          10 years ago

          Re: What are these: "~" (over a note)

          isn't an appogiatura a type of passing tone, where a skip resolves by step? like the opposite of an escape tone?

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        7. by wesmiller
          (55 posts)

          10 years ago

          Re: What are these: "~" (over a note)

          Hi Silversax: I think it was Golferguy who hit this one on the head I was just giving it the name. Technically its a type of trill from the Baroque (French Baroque) period. Jazz guys picked it up, started using it, and who wants to call it an appogiatura much less spell it? So the non-classical more down to earth players simply call it a turn. I think passing tones are more simplistic in nature and have more to do with theoretical analysis than performance practice. Should that little symbol have had a vertical slash through it the notes played would be (for ex.) A-B-A. There can also be flats above and below to indicate accidentals within the "turn" (appujbdeb). God! Time for a joke: "if it ain't baroque don't fix it". I know,....terrible. This concludes my "trilling" observation. Peace.

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