Saxophone Forum


by jazzman244
(1 post)
10 years ago

Cannonball Sax's

There is a brand of saxophones called Cannonball, I'm not sure if it's in any relation to Cannonball Aderly. I have never actually played one but I have heard one and it has a nice bright sound. I was thinking of buying one but I wanted to know if anyone had played one

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  1. by phrostyphish
    (1 post)

    7 years ago

    Re: Cannonball Sax's

    I have one of the Raven series alto saxophones, and was initially happy with my purchase. That's until three of the stones fell off and two of the welds came loose. With that, I feel my opinions about the crap that accompanies these saxophones should be commented on as well... namely the mouthpiece and ligature. Both of these are amateurish, at best, and do not meet the needs of a professional saxophonist... nor do they live up to the quality one comes to expect when purchasing a saxophone of the purported "professional" caliber. Nay, I tossed this cheap plastic and metal combo; I continue to use my C* and old Soloist mouthpieces for classical work and my Morgan for jazz and studio work. If you're wanting a REAL professional saxophone, I'd recommend sticking with a Selmer. I've had this Cannonball piece of crap for a year, now, and the problems I've had do not make the sound quality worth it. Meanwhile, my older SA-80 alto is going strong... and hasn't popped a weld yet! I guess I'll just hand down this Cannonball when my son is old enough to play.

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  2. by cannonballsax44
    (2 posts)

    7 years ago

    Re: Cannonball Sax's

    I was really interested to find this topic. I personally have been playing for about 7 years. I am still in high school, obviously no veteran, but I have two music teachers for parents, and a brother going to school for music, and I've been told many a time that my abilities far outreach those of people playing twice as long as me. Again, I'm not saying I'm an expert, but the first horn I ever had (minus the Bundy II I started on) was a Cannonball Alto (Black nickel, laquer keys) and I have been nothing but satisfied with it since the day I got it. I myself own a 1916 Holton Rudy Wiedoft, a 1927 Conn New Wonder Series II, both altos, as well as another Cannonball, a tenor, a jupiter bari, and a few other horns. I've played Yamaha 875's, 5 digit MK VI's, Selmer References, and I can safely say that I like the overall feel and sound of the Cannonball far more than any of them. Suprisingly, other than the MK VI (of course), the Yamaha came quite close. I almost actually liked the key layout more...almost. As for my tenor, it is by far one of the most amazing saxophones I have ever played. That's literally all I can say. Obviously, as mentioned by many other people in this stream, the stock mouthpieces are complete crap. And in response to people saying the solders are loosening, that must just happen to the newest of the horns. I will say that they have gone downhill from the early horns off the line. Right now, I'm working on selling off some things to purchase a Cannonball Soprano to replace my E.M. Winston. I haven't played the brand new Cannonballs in a little while, but I think I can safely say that my particular horns blow most other horns out of the water (particularly the tenor--I've had 30 and 40 year veterans play it and say it felt better than their MK VI.). But please, don't take my word, just look at the testamonials on their website: www.cannonballmusic.com

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    1. by CountSpatula
      (602 posts)

      7 years ago

      Re: Cannonball Sax's

      Glad you like your Cannonball! Hope you continue your music career=) Though of course, Cannonball is a company trying to sell their products...would you put negative comments up on a product your selling?

      Reply To Post AIM


    2. by ptberger
      (1 post)

      6 years ago

      Re: Cannonball Sax's

      Hi, I noticed you mention that newer Cannonball's have gone downhill from the earlier horns...is that a general consensus among Cannonball afficionandos? Are the early Knights 98s and CSA3000s considered better made horns then than new series offerings?

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      1. by cannonballsax44
        (2 posts)

        6 years ago

        Re: Cannonball Sax's

        I've found more recently that the quality of instrument has once again come up. I'm thinking, next month, I might go buy a new cannonball alto. For a while, I had been finding that I liked my older models better than the transitional period instruments between the big bell and stone series, but the new horns how are quite superb, I must say.

        Reply To Post


    3. by twogirls
      (1 post)

      7 years ago

      Re: Cannonball Sax's

      Hi, I am looking to sell a Cannonball A9000 BS ROYAL CROWN ALTO in mint condition. I would like to know it's approximate value. Can someone help?

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    4. by brylloyd
      (2 posts)

      7 years ago

      Re: Cannonball Sax's

      As far as tone, play whatever Sax you like!!! That's what it comes down to. I was worried about durability with my silver Cannonball curved soprano when I bought it as well. I have played it for 5 years now and I've never even had to have it adjusted. I took it in to the shop twice just to make sure and the tech said, he couldn't find anything to tune up. I have a Yamaha tenor that I've had to get adjusted about once a year. Nothing major. Maybe that's because the soprano is so much smaller and it's harder to bend stuff if it's not as long. I can't speak to the durability of the Cannonball tenors or altos, but I firmly believe that if you take care of your horns, you won't be breaking them. If any horn you have is faling apart, then I would attribute it to rough handling either when you play or in the case. I have played a Mark VI, Mark VII, and a Super80 and all of them had their issues with laquer coming off, key guards popping off, springs breaking etc. The horn will expand and contract if you leave it in your car on a cold day and then play it. This will cause stuff to get out of adjustment too as well as bend things, paticularly on tenors or bari's. I think Cannonball has way too many endorsements from fantastic professional players to ignore them. Don't write them off because of what someone else says.

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    5. by jjsax
      (3 posts)

      6 years ago

      Re: Cannonball Sax's

      Every sax has people who will swear by them. If you sound great...you sound great. I had a teacher (Randy Lee - one oclock, Elvis tour) who played on a piece conn and was amazing. I have played several cannonballs, owned 2 (White night and Mad Meg big bell) and loved them. Tevas Lakhaut is making a great horn. Many players (Larry Panella, Gerald Albright, etc) are loving them. They are priced well. My experience has been that they are like selmers...you can get a good one or a bad one. They are not as consistant as a Yamaha. The Mk VI alto I now have is the only 6 I have played on that I liked better than my Mad meg (after a restoration by Ken Beason). Don't listen with your eyes - listen with your ears.

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    6. by basiliko
      (21 posts)

      5 years ago

      Re: Cannonball Sax's

      I have a silver stone series bari personally made for me through cannonball... can't speak for the cannonball alto's & tenors but My bari is great. I picked it over the new selmers, it plays as well as the new yamaha's & a bunch of other bari's I tried out. You haters need to chill I've been playing on this bari for 3 years now..with no problems. If you think this is all I play... also play Dave Guardala tenor(original 1st generation), Conn DJH modified alto, Yamaha soprano. try the cannonball bari's out...I'm a big supporter of them! the cannonball alto's were a bit tin (e) in sound. www.8ohmsband.com

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    7. by psycho
      (2 posts)

      5 years ago

      Re: Cannonball Sax's

      I am a new player and i am looking for my first alto saxophone..I heard about the Cannonball brand from my teacher..I have read a lot about the Cannonballs but nothing helped me...I searched Cannonball's website and i found the Alcazar and Sceptyr as intermediate and student models.Does anybody know something further for these?I am looking for a saxophone that can help me to go further and surely not to hang it on the wall after a few years....Furthermore, what about the prices?

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      1. by RyanCannonball
        (36 posts)

        5 years ago

        Re: Cannonball Sax's

        No matter how many opinions you read or hear, the one that matters most (by far) is your own; you need to go play the horn for yourself and see what you think. Of course, we’d love for you to end up with a Cannonball, but you need to make sure to play as many horns as you reasonably can, and buy the one you like best. If you decide to go with a student model, you don’t have worry about getting a low-quality student horn from us, because all our student horns are now produced in the same factory as our top-of-the-line pro horns. Also, all our horns come with a 5-year warranty. Your store might not have the Sceptyrs in stock, because we’ve been overwhelmed with orders for them – they’re a lot more popular than we expected. Give us a call at 801-563-3081 or send an email through cannonballmusic.com/dealerinquiry.php and we'll help you find your local dealer so you can go play some and check out prices. Thanks, Ryan

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    8. by TechnoGD
      (1 post)

      5 years ago

      Re: Cannonball Sax's

      I play a Cannonball Big Bell Global Series bari which I bought in USA some years ago. The horn has a great sound with good projection and intonation. The standard mouthpiece is useless; I use a Yanagisawa which suits most of the big band work I do. The horn replicates the Selmer SA80 in keywork, key positioning etc., but has a brighter sound. Downsides? The lacquer is very poor (my bari looks almost as old as my MkVI 1954 Alto!) and the engraving is very shallow so when the lacquer falls off the engraving 'disappears'. Cannonball have been very supportive with spares - I don't know what the dealer network is like here in UK.

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    9. by ILike2Play
      (1 post)

      5 years ago

      Re: Cannonball Sax's

      I was happy at first with the purchase of my big bell stone series until I found out how limited of a sound it had. The only sound it produces is a brighter edgy sound. I would skip the cannonball and keep looking unless you want that bright edgy sound.

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    10. by oldtenorpicker
      (5 posts)

      3 years ago

      Re: Cannonball Sax's

      I've not played one either. Curiosity made me read most of the comments in this forum, just to learn others' opinions. That seems to be it.. mostly opinion. Everything here from adulation to vehemence. The truth is probably somewhere in the middle. My experience with saxophones over the past 60 years is that while there is this almost cultist group that absolutely worships the Selmer Mark VI, especially if it was built on June 14, 1957, at about 3:00 in the afternoon, my personal experience with these horns (I've owned 2 of them) is that while they are very good instruments, there are others that are just as good, 'though I admit that none so far have matched the Selmer's key action. Pitch, sound, response... that's another issue. I liked my Selmers a lot, but I also liked my King Super 20, My Herb Couf Keilwerth, my old Conn 12M, and a few others. All for different reasons. I keep waiting for that "perfect" horn... you know the one, in tune, good dark sound, fast action, lightening response, light weight, beautiful design, even scale from low Bb to double "D". I haven't seen it yet. Of course it should sell for about $500. That's why I'm curious about the Cannonball.

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    11. by Stewart_Dreis
      (12 posts)

      10 years ago

      Re: Cannonball Sax's

      Hellow, I had the luxury to play a Cannonball saxophone. They are amazing, they run at $1863 for alto and $2133 for tenor. The trick is finding a dealer close to you because the only choose to put their saxophones in certain music stores. If I had the money I would buy one. They have a good solid tone, amazing range I could play the low Bb on the tenor like a was playing a A. And yes they do relate to Cannonball Adderly ( my favorite jazz player.) Hope I helped you. Stewart Dreis

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      1. by jazzsenna
        (5 posts)

        10 years ago

        Re: Cannonball Sax's

        You better get a mouthpiece and a good reed or just plain simple LEARN HOW TO PLAY THE INSTRUMENT FIRST

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      2. by Dirty_Reggae
        (55 posts)

        10 years ago

        Re: Cannonball Sax's

        Sorry for replying twice but i gotta say this to Sax man. Get your facts straight man! Hollow tone!? Its beautiful. You need have a bit tougher chops to get past the bigger bell but when you do, they sound amazing. And, secondly, no. They dont sell they're saxes to just anyone. I live near a dealer who knows the guy who gfave him the deal and it IS exclusive. They are for the person who wants a different, unique, beautiful sound past the smooth jazz bull that every mark 6 pro has. Cannonball is the next big thing in the sax world. Oh, and soz if this sounds kind of aggressive, just friendly debating.

        Reply To Post


        1. by SaxMan
          (559 posts)

          10 years ago

          Re: Cannonball Sax's

          See, you are 16, you play in a ska band which is by far an improvement over most modern music, but it is still a far cry from real music. see, most people our age think of beutiful sound as disgusting, brash, bright nasty abhorant tone, but there are a few exceptions, like me, spike, brecker brothers...etc. I am a classical musician, I don't get off on jazz much, which if I wanted to be some crackpot jazz gigger I might like the C-ball. But in most situations, there is another horn that surpasses the cannonball by far, in some case for several hundred dollars less. your embouchure has nothing to do with the size of the bell, in fact, the bell flare has less effect on the tone than any other part of the sax - meaning, the base of the posts, on the OUTSIDE of the horn have more effect on the tone than the bell does. The bell mainly affects volume. and btw, when I tried out the C-ball, I was playing on a modded alto piece that I had opened to .110. Read my post, I said that they will sell their horns to anyone that is a dealer. That exclusive was due to the fact that that requested one, meaning, he is cheating you on them with no other competition. C-balls are for your very typical person, with the very typical overly bright tone. BTW, koz plays yamahas, coltrane played a VI, bird played a VI a couple times, virginia mayhew plays mark VI's, harle plays a VI etc etc etc. I can think of many classical players that play VI's, but you wouldn't know them. (-Edited for language on 8/8/2004 5:35:32 PM.)

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        2. by bcwhiton
          (3 posts)

          8 years ago

          Re: Cannonball Sax's

          Okay I've got you all covered. If you've never tried the horn don't bash it. To each their own. But I also caution you to know what sounds good before you just buy any old horn...yes probably any pro model will be better than a student but know what good sound is before you buy a saxophone. Personally i am a Cannonball fan...I'm a jazz player and a classical player...if you think classical players don't play on Cannonball then listen to the New Century Saxophone Quartet...they are one of the best and exclusively Cannonball...as for jazz Cannonball saxophones are pretty unbeatable...Mark VI not all that good yes a lot of players have played on them but if you're really good you can make just about anything work the way you want it to...so stop all the complaining if you want a Selmer try it out find one you like a buy it...If you want a Cannonball try it out and buy it..if you don't know ask someone to help you...That person will obviously have a biased opinion based on what they play on but it's better than nothing

          Reply To Post


        3. by CountSpatula
          (602 posts)

          8 years ago

          Re: Cannonball Sax's

          But bcwhiton please keep in mind that Cannonball isn't a magical sax that works for everyone. And Mark VI's are great horns...just overpriced.

          Reply To Post AIM


      3. by golferguy675
        (600 posts)

        10 years ago

        Re: Cannonball Sax's

        Bull that every mark 6 pro has? I wish you had said that in person . A very large percentage of they great saxophonists out there use mark VIs, not just smooth jazz. I had the misfortune to try a Cannonball saxophone for a month, and it was the biggest dissapointment I've ever had in a horn. To put it bluntly, it just fell apart from the seams. Next big thing in the sax world? /Oh, and sorry if this sounds kind of aggressive, just friendly debating\\ : ) (-edited for content on 8/8/2004 5:32:55 PM.)

        Reply To Post


      4. by jazzsenna
        (5 posts)

        10 years ago

        Re: Cannonball Sax's

        WHAT IS WITH THE viS THAT EVERYONE THINK THAT THEY ARE THE ONLY HORNS AVAILABLE THA IS GOOD. i HAVE A VINTAGE vi AND A GLOBAL SERIES cb AND i LOVE MY cANNONBALL. cHECK THE EBAY AND YOU WILL SEE A LOT OF PEOPLE TRYING TO SELL THEIR viS WHILE THEY STILL CAN GET A GOOD MONEY FOR IT.MY STUDENTS PLAY CANNONBALL SAXES AND THEY HAVE IMPROVED THEIR PLAYING A LOT, IS JUST MORE CONFIDENCE WITH THE INSTRUMENT, PLAI AND SIMPLE

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      5. by MatteSelmerSeriesii
        (2 posts)

        8 years ago

        Re: Cannonball Sax's

        No. You are mistaken. Cannonballs suck. Selmers are the best.

        Reply To Post


    12. by jazzsenna
      (5 posts)

      10 years ago

      Re: Cannonball Sax's

      I`m so with you Man. The CBs smoked any horn out there by a mile and I mean, I play on a vintage VI for years and I can say that I`m very good. The CBs are just amazing horns

      Reply To Post


    13. by swingstreet
      (315 posts)

      8 years ago

      Re: Cannonball Sax's

      Cannonball Adderley is also one of my favorite players, but in fact, the Cannonball saxophone has nothing to do with Cannonball Adderley. The name is for actual cannonballs. They keep referring to a medeival theme on their website. The Mad Meg, for example, is named for a particular medeival cannon. Nowhere do they ever mention Cannonball Adderley.

      Reply To Post


  3. by Sax Mom
    (964 posts)

    10 years ago

    Re: Cannonball Sax's--This is getting Nasty

    Okay, it's time for me to be a Mom. You guys are all welcome to your own opinions, but you could be a little kinder to one another. I'd much rather you pointed out another person's error in kindness so we can all learn without having to suffer through that juvenile name-calling...

    Reply To Post


  4. by manicreed
    (10 posts)

    10 years ago

    Re: Cannonball Sax's

    I'm not an expert by any means, but I would like to say this- I tried a Cannonball Global Series Alto for about three weeks. I honestly didn't like it. Very bright and annoying. In response to an earlier reply-yes the engraving is laser-done, and the key work is done in Taiwan, by "trained specialists". Okay, like I said before, I'm not an expert, so yell at me if you want, don't care.

    Reply To Post


  5. by tritune
    (2 posts)

    10 years ago

    Re: Cannonball Sax's

    i bought a cannonball t9000s silver plate "royal crown" back in '98 and for the most part have been very happy with it. it was one of the first generations of cannonballs to come off the line and consequently the action is pretty bad (think old, conn10m bad!) but the sound is amazing! and that was the main selling point for me. i don't know if the later models have the same sound quality or if mine is just a fluke. but it has a big, robust sound that i just dig, all up and down the horn. the name i think has to do with the company's founders being interested in some sort of "medieval" sort of motif for the horns. i think a trip to there website will eaither confirm or refute this claim. but i don't think it really has anything to do with mr. adderly

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    1. by ashraf
      (1 post)

      7 years ago

      Re: Cannonball Sax's

      hi

      Reply To Post


  6. by blondie_sax_playr
    (1 post)

    10 years ago

    Re: Cannonball Sax's

    I would like to offer some mature advice. Although Cannonballs are a bit pricy, it is definitely something awesome in which to invest. This coming from somebody who has played my Pro Cannonball for a little over six years. It is the black Alto with silver keys and was a gift from my AWESOME parents. (Love you mom & dad) I can safely say that the sound is nothing short of pulchritudinous. Magnificent, angelic as well as alluring are all understatements. My Conn and Yamaha do NO JUSTICE!! (But that's a give-me, right!?) The Big Bell Global Series' big bell magnifies each beautiful note you blow into it by at least 75%, that's a lot! If you'd like more info/advice, just e-mail me! (blondie_sax_playr@yahoo.com) ~Mechelle One Love One God One Way

    Reply To Post


    1. by SaxMan
      (559 posts)

      10 years ago

      Re: Cannonball Sax's

      whatever you say, cannonballs ARE NOT expensive, your conn I imagine is a student model - fairly good likely hood that its a mexi-conn, and the yamahas - dont get me started, though the 21 and 23 are fairly good besides being built wrong.

      Reply To Post


    2. by connsaxman_jim
      (2336 posts)

      10 years ago

      Re: Cannonball Sax's

      This is the last comment I'm going to make on the Cannonballs. My last post was meant to be funny as well as voice my opinion, but I didn't mean to offend anyone. As for tone quality, everyone has their own opinion of what sounds good, and it's all relavent to the type of music that you're playing. I've never cared for Yamaha saxes. Nothing against Yamaha at all. I play Yamaha keyboards exclusively (except for vintage Hammonds) and I LOVE their PA gear and just about everything else I've used. I could never get the sound I wanted from a Yamaha sax. They are a well made horn and play very well however. What model Conn did you play Mechelle? I love my 6M underslung, but I also have a 1952 Selmer Super Balanced Action (pre mk. VI). They're 2 different creatures and play very different. I play mostly tenor (1948 Conn 10M) Here is the problem I have with the cannonballs that I've seen. While the horn has a relatively decent action for a cheaply made horn (I said cheaply made, not cheap to buy), but the action does not stay adjusted very well. The metal is soft and the keys bend and break easily. This is the case of most of the Chinese, Taiwan made horns I've seen. The leather on the pads is really thin, cheap and feels more like a vinyl than leather. I've had to repad a couple of them after only a couple years of use. Typically the larger bell saxes are brighter with a fuller sound, and I was anxious to play a cannonball and try one out. They are very bright, but the alto I tried sounded really tinny to me. I didn't care for the tone at all. I tried a couple different mouthpieces, and the more I played with the horn the less I liked it. It's not like a played it for 15 minutes and said it down and said I hate it. I took it, along with my Selmer to a gig where I was playing a lot of Grover Washington Jr. kind of stuff; and gave it a fair trial. I have a friend who owns a music store, and I do some repairs and appraisals on vintage instruments, and check out their used instruments before they go up for sale, so I frequently take horns home or to gigs to try them out. One of the best modern saxophones I've found at ANY price is the Keilwerth SX series! WOW what a horn. Pretty hard to beat a new Selmer Reference or Series III. Conn's new horns are pretty decent. I'm not a big fan of Jupiter, EM. Winston or LA Sax, but they're decent for the money. I wouldn't buy a DC Pro or a Global Series, or any of the junk you see out there for less than about $800! If you're cannonball works for you and you're happy with the sound, great! I'd hold onto that Conn though if you still have it! Good luck

      Reply To Post Yahoo!


  7. by connsaxman_jim
    (2336 posts)

    10 years ago

    Re: Cannonball Sax's

    I've played a cannonball. I've played just about everything out there; new and old. I'd rather play just about anything than a cannonball. See those BRAND NEW saxes on Ebay for less than $300? At least for $300, one shouldn't expect much in terms of quality or sound. For the price of a cannonball, you'd think you were getting a well made sax, but you're not! They're a cheaply made instrument. In my opinion the sound SUCKS!!! They sound like tin. I could build you a better sounding saxophone out of tin foil, and it would probably hold together better too! Anyone who would piss their money away on a horn like this has no business even touching a REAL saxophone!

    Reply To Post Yahoo!


    1. by jamminCB
      (6 posts)

      7 years ago

      Re: Cannonball Sax's

      It's as simple as this....If you can't get a good sound on a CB then you probably aren't made for the horn......diff. ppl have diff preferences, i have played CB for about 4 years and it is better than an VI or Yam, or any sax that i've evr played.....to get the best results....try one for yourself.........and if you can't adapt.....your embouchure probably isn't strong enough for a CB

      Reply To Post


  8. by BariSaxplyr
    (35 posts)

    10 years ago

    Re: Cannonball Sax's

    I had a cannonball tenor for a couple of months. It sounded alrite at first, but started to basically fall apart. I ended up getting rid of it and havent played tenor since, because i could never find a nice enough horn, that i could afford. I played some great Mark Vi's and stuff, but they're ridiculiously expensive. I think the problem with cannonball is there is no consistency. They're not mass produced, which is good and bad. They each have their own character. However, I have heard other people play Cannonball's, and they actualy sound pretty darn good. Then again, I've also played some pretty crappy selmers, so who knows.

    Reply To Post


  9. by zwaggio
    (3 posts)

    9 years ago

    Re: Cannonball Sax's

    I was looking for a backup to my VI alto and thought with CB BB I found a decent horn. Excellent intonation, but sort of "cheap" in certain aspects ( noted in other replies). Then I tried the new Yamaha Custom Z. That did it. It's priced about the same as the CB but has much more flexible, "living", tone and response. Has some intonation issues yes, but no worse than the VI. No wonder Phil Wodds finally is playing a new horn. Get the Yamaha for about the same $ as the Cannonball. You'll have a real horn to play.

    Reply To Post


  10. by Dirty_Reggae
    (55 posts)

    10 years ago

    Re: Cannonball Sax's

    Ive played on several Cannonball models and actually am saving up for one right now. I really suggest buying one. The bigger bell really gives a great tone. They also have 2 interchangable necks for brighter and darker tones. By the way, im new to this site, just discovered it right now. Im 16 years old and i play 1st sax in my highschool jazz band, and tenor in a ska/reggae band. So yeh, hey everyone.

    Reply To Post


    1. by golferguy675
      (600 posts)

      10 years ago

      Re: Cannonball Sax's

      They have nothing to do with Cannonball Adderly whatsoever. He played a King Super 20. I think if Cannonball knew about these, he would turn over in his grave. Seriously, spend your money on a more reputable brand(Yamaha, Selmer, Yanigasawa, Keilwerth...etc)

      Reply To Post


      1. by bluesguy07
        (3 posts)

        10 years ago

        Re: Cannonball Sax's

        I have played on a Cannonball sax for the past 2 1/2 years now, and i think it is a decent intermediate sax. the sound quality was decent (not great) in the lower octave, and got better as i worked my way up the staff. I used a C* mouthpiece, and vandoren reeds (3.5-4), so i don't quite know how that directly affected my intonation. I don't think any professionals would want to use a C-Ball sax, and i recommend that you spend a little more and buy a selmer paris, or a Yamaha yas-62 or higher sax. oh, and a bigger bell only attributes to a deeper/darker sound

        Reply To Post


      2. by Qi Note
        (1 post)

        10 years ago

        Re: Cannonball Sax's

        There are other intermediate horns out there that may be a better value. (I haven't tried the Cannon.) I tried and purchased the impressive "Daniel's" alto for a student, at a much better price than those mentioned above. I got it at Roberto's Woodwind in NYC--give them a call or check their website!

        Reply To Post


      3. by bluesguy07
        (3 posts)

        10 years ago

        Re: Cannonball Sax's

        i just checked, and according to

        Reply To Post


      4. by SaxMan
        (559 posts)

        10 years ago

        Re: Cannonball Sax's

        yeah, you have ot be a dealer, but pretty much anyone can become one as long as there are a few spaces still open.

        Reply To Post


      5. by The Prophetic Sax
        (1 post)

        10 years ago

        Re: Cannonball Sax's

        Hey Fellas. Anyone can become a dealer. Tell me something though. Does anybody know any pro that plays them. Any good player can make the crappiest horn sound good(look at Bird). I've played one, I couldn't stand it. The tuning was worse than a yanagisawa and it was quite bright as everyone said above (granted I have a bright tone myself). So, does anyone witha Blue Note, ECM, Impulse, or Verve record deal play them. If you ask my opinion, these people above that are raving about them are the type of people who walk down to their friendly neighborhood music store that carries only 3 kinds of reeds, and these people succomb to their disgusting business lies. If you want to hear what people think, why don't you email someone like Brecker or Redman, or a sax prof. at a university who actually knows what he's talking about. Don't listen to the guy in the store trying to sell it. He can probably play as well as well as a high school senior or a mediocre college student, not that there is anything wrong with that, he has just chosen the business aspect of music. And go to a real saxophone shop like the Saxophone Store in Evanston IL, not the jerks that sell horns way overpriced to make a commission. Cannonballs are basically student models with some fancy writing on the side and the laquer taken off to make a bad player a.k.a. sucker look hardcore.

        Reply To Post


      6. by cuber
        (653 posts)

        6 years ago

        Re: Cannonball Sax's

        by sax store in evanston, do you mean pmwoodwind?

        Reply To Post


      7. by sax_maniac
        (984 posts)

        10 years ago

        Cannonball Sux - er I mean SAX

        Tell me something. If high B and C are in tune and high D and above is in tune, how in the hell can high C# end up sharp by a quarter tone? I just experienced this trying a Cannonball. And the other horns in the shop are well setup. I tried several. As far as I'm concerned, there's better options in that price range like an intermediate Yamaha. I know. There's good ones and bad ones. But when you are paying anything over $1000, the damned thing should at least play in tune. I also found the palm and pinky keywork to be terribly awkward. And the low notes rather stuffy - no tonal consistency. Sounded like I was playing 3 different saxophones. And when a horn says "Designed in the USA" and you can't find out where it was actually made, beware, man. Beware.

        Reply To Post


      8. by bluesguy07
        (3 posts)

        10 years ago

        Re: Cannonball Sux - er I mean SAX

        i use the alt. C# fingering to bring it down in pitch. It is still a little sharp, but its better to have a slightly sharp C# than have the same fingering come out as a flat Db. and i did also have that problem with the palm keys, and the pinkey (g#) key. all the professionals (unless endorsed by) that i know of, play the SA80 or the new refrence series if not a Mark VI. There may be other good professional saxes, but not that i have played on.

        Reply To Post


      9. by saxyfire
        (9 posts)

        10 years ago

        Re: Cannonball sax

        I don't know what cannonball you were playing on, but I think that cannonball's are very in tune. It's a horn that I think is really great for the bigband sound. It just has the big full sound. And the lower register.....is sick. The only problem I find is that it does have bad key work and a lack of character. But really sound is what matters not key work and my view on the lack of character is simply my preference and the kid may like it. I kind of do agree that it is kind of a student model tho, but hey maybe that's what the kid wants. I guess you get what you pay for. Oh and bluesguy you are definately right....the mark7 and especially the new refernce have amazing key work. I thought the yangisawas have great key work too. All of these horns are very dependable, but yet remember the price tag and suddenly they don't look so good

        Reply To Post


      10. by sax_maniac
        (984 posts)

        10 years ago

        Re: Cannonball sax

        It said "Global Series" on the bell flare and had a sh!tload of engraving all over it. It had a silver plated neck. All I can say is that it looked far better than it played. Someone who wants that big band sound should get themselves an old Conn. At least on those horns, the intonation is worth fighting for.

        Reply To Post


      11. by saxyfire
        (9 posts)

        10 years ago

        Re: Cannonball sax

        Your right it did have a lot of engraving. I belive that it's lazer and not done by hand(I hate that) However, globle series comes with two necks one of which would be silver plated. I said that it had a great bigband sound not THE bigband sound. You are very right about the vintage conns. I wish I had one....but well you know. what I was tring to say is that Globe series horns have a good sound for their price. It's sad tho....it seems to me that you are paying for their looks and not the sound. This is why I didn't buy a cannonball. If you want a horn with professional looks you get this one. If you what a horn with professional sound, stay away.

        Reply To Post


      12. by sax_maniac
        (984 posts)

        10 years ago

        Re: Cannonball sax

        A very respectable 6M or 10M can be had for the $1500-$1800 the Cannonballs are selling for. And it doesn't have to be a Naked Lady (Artist series) Conn to be worth playing. Lately, I've been evaluating bang for the buck on horns, and sax gear is really quite the racket. If students of saxophone were taught how to care for their horn and adjust it on their own, I think there'd be a lot more tolerance for some of the lesser gear that's out there. What really pissed me off was the price difference between a Selmer III and a Ref 54 considering that they are for all practical purposes are the same horn. Amazing what a little marketing can do to the price. Selmer get's everyone's panties damp talking about a Mark VI reissue and BLAM! Out comes a Series III without the C# tonehole, less ergonomic keywork, and your choice of a few horrible looking finishes. Why not just make a "simulated patina" finish with spotty patches of different colored lacquer. That might actually warrant the $800 premium. I know. Whanny whanny.

        Reply To Post


      13. by SaxMan
        (559 posts)

        10 years ago

        Re: Cannonball sax

        The cannonball would make a pitiful big band sound. all it is is loud, it has no character and is really bright. thats not any big band sound at all. the difference between the series III alto and the ref alto is about 500 bucks, new tooling had to be made for it, and I would imagine that the lacquer is more expensive. BTW, the ref alto comes in one finish, gold lacquer almost the same as that on a mark VI, but just ever so slightly darker. I dont think you know what you are talking about.

        Reply To Post


      14. by sax_maniac
        (984 posts)

        10 years ago

        Re: Cannonball sax

        Sorry, omniscient SaxWeenie. Please don't report me to the saxophone police. I've seen a tenor with that horrible matte finish and then the coffee orange cough medicine that they spilled on the altos (I would hardly call it gold though that's maybe what they call it). That would make TWO different finishes I've seen on Reference horns. Not so sure that it's so much about me not knowing what I'm talking about or you being such a pantywaist.

        Reply To Post


      15. by SaxMan
        (559 posts)

        10 years ago

        Re: Cannonball sax

        The ALTO reference comes in ONLY the lacquer, were not talking about damn tenors. Have you ever seen a ref alto infront of you? or just in pictures? your a sax coniseur if I am not mistaken, you should know better that pictures dont pick up everything. No, it is definately you not having a damn clue in the world. A repair technician that doesnt know about chemical cleaning. theres your first clue.

        Reply To Post


      16. by RivBroSax
        (1 post)

        10 years ago

        Re: Cannonball sax

        You folks out there who are putting down the Cannonball saxes are lost. I have challenged many of my customers and friends who play on everything from Selmer VI, VII, SA80 1,2,3, etc and Yamaha "pick a number" to try the Cannonball Saxes. With the variety of lacquer, no lacquer, nickel plate, or silver plate, and combinations thereof they all have found a Cannonball that equalled or bested their current sax. I play on a Cannonball as well and it smoked my Mark VI (123000) and my Keilwerth. Everyone out there should clean out their ears and be happy that there is a sax out there that can do everything well. In direct comparisons with open minded players and listeners, the Cannonball has beaten saxes costing 3 times as much. I couldn't be happier with my horn. I have been a technician for 21 years and am impressed with the quality of build. It is far more consistent and better built than any Selmer or Yamaha. It is the only sax on the market that plays right out of the box. Yes, this sounds like a Cannonball Ad but if any of you with open minds go to Cannonball's website, read about them and see who is playing and endorsing them, then find a dealer who has the new big bell series and go try for yourself.

        Reply To Post


      17. by sax_maniac
        (984 posts)

        10 years ago

        Re: Cannonball sax

        ... the preceding announcement does not necessarily reflect the views of this station or its management ...

        Reply To Post


      18. by jazzsenna
        (5 posts)

        10 years ago

        Re: Cannonball sax

        I agree with you The CBs are great for the price and the hell with the complainers, they probably don`t even have the chops for the CBs

        Reply To Post


      19. by sax_maniac
        (984 posts)

        10 years ago

        Message to the Man...

        SaxWeenie - I'm not a repair technician (in the official sense), nor would I ever claim to be a "sax connoisseur" (but thanks for the compliments). For me being such an idiot, you sure seem to hold me in pretty high regard... I'm a passionate hobbyist and a pretty good player considering it's not my full-time job. I do know a few things FROM EXPERIENCE and will not hesitate sharing my point of view if I think it's relevant.

        Reply To Post


      20. by NickelPlated
        (20 posts)

        10 years ago

        ^^**__**!!CANNONBALLS ARE GREAT!!**__**^^

        Hey everyone, i have tried a cannonball for a year in college band and they are absoluutely great! They have a beautiful solid tone, and are just plain awesome!

        Reply To Post


      21. by sax_maniac
        (984 posts)

        10 years ago

        Re: ^^**__**!!CANNONBALLS ARE GREAT!!**__**^^

        An update... I tried a buddy's Cannonball tenor with my Gregory mpc and I was impressed. A decent horn for the price, though it doesn't compare with top of the line Yamahas or Selmers. But if you're looking to spend $3000, you can buy a Cannonball and have enough leftover for a nice Mardi Gras vacation in New Orleans.

        Reply To Post


      22. by jazzsenna
        (5 posts)

        10 years ago

        Re: ^^**__**!!CANNONBALLS ARE GREAT!!**__**^^

        So buy a cannonball in the first place, they are amazing. I just purchased one unlacquered and I love it

        Reply To Post


      23. by The_MarkVI
        (80 posts)

        10 years ago

        Re: ^^**__**!!CANNONBALLS ARE GREAT!!**__**^^

        Hears the deal about cannonballs. They do sound great but in the long run their are a pain. After a year the sax will start doing its own thing and mainly becuase they are made in Tawian. I DO NOT reccomend any sax made in tawian

        Reply To Post


      24. by bluesepsilon
        (2 posts)

        10 years ago

        Re: ^^**__**!!CANNONBALLS ARE GREAT!!**__**^^

        I hear the Accent sopranos are made by Cannonball... The first couple tries I've given an Accent soprano left me with a favorable impression of the horn, but since the instrument costs only $795 new, I'm a little suspicious. I don't want to have to even think about buying a new horn for decades, so even though this Accent is a great price for its sound and features, I'm probably going to suck it up and dish out for a Yanagisawa or Selmer SII, maybe a Yamaha 675.

        Reply To Post


      25. by connsaxman_jim
        (2336 posts)

        10 years ago

        Re: ^^**__**!!CANNONBALLS ARE GREAT!!**__**^^

        Have you been doing drugs in college??? Maybe listening to loud heavy metal music has damaged your hearing?!? or both! beautiful solid tone? You want to hear beautiful sold tone...come here and stick your head in this metal garbage can while I beat it with a stick! Here's my opinion of cannonballs.....They should be melted down into round balls and used to blow up ships! Then maybe they would be deserving of the name "cannonball"

        Reply To Post Yahoo!


      26. by zwaggio
        (3 posts)

        10 years ago

        Re: ^^**__**!!CANNONBALLS ARE GREAT!!**__**^^

        I've playing professionaly on and off for over 20 years. Most of that time was on a Balanced Action and then a Mark IV. I picked up a Cannon BB Alto about 2 yrs ago. I have to say that some of the naysayers here are way out of line. The positives of the horn are excellent intonation ( yes, this is true and not otherwise!) and very easy altissimo. While the tone doesn't have as much "character" as the VI it is not "ugly" in the least. I have tried much worse sound horns that cost more. My one and only complaint is that I find the action a bit stiff. They're good horns. Possibly not the godsend that some of the advocates here rave about, but very decent.

        Reply To Post


      27. by saxguy9345
        (21 posts)

        10 years ago

        Re: Cannonball Sax's

        To whomever said "Tuning worse than a Yanagisawa" That makes it better than most yamahas and selmers right? Don't kick the one known, proven, set-in-stone advantage of a Yanagisawa saxophone, and that would be playability right out of the case. Of course this is coming from a Yana player. I'm not knocking all other saxophones, oh except for the Cannonball. I played the Big Bell nickel plated with silver keys side by side with a Selmer III and a Yanagisawa A992. I kept the Yana, the Selmer put up a great fight but lost, and the Cannonball spent most of my test time up on the wall. It was tinny and unresponsive as far as keywork goes. Nothing more than a dressed up intermediate sax. Has anyone mentioned that they are made in Taiwan? Or some other such asian country that are currently infamous for their saxophones. That is what I've heard.

        Reply To Post AIM


      28. by connsaxman_jim
        (2336 posts)

        10 years ago

        Re: Cannonball Sax's

        I've only played a few Yanagisawa saxophones. I think they have the best soprano hands down, and I played their new pro model alto also. I forget the model number, but they're around $5000. WOW!!! What a horn, and I never would have expected something this nice from Yanagisawa. I tried a Cannonball alto and it didn't impress me at all! someone suggested that the model I tried was an older model and that the new ones were better. Well a couple nights ago, I took a brand new big bell global series tenor, and I played it for about 2 hours straight. I tried 5 different mouthpieces on it; the original that it comes with, a vintage Otto Link Super Tone Master, a Meyer metal piece, a Rico Royal graftonite piece, and a Selmer S 80. I used my usual 2 1/2 Vanduren reed. The sax didn't sound too bad with the Rico mouthpiece. Both the Otto Link and Meyer metal pieces sounded very thin. The action felt much better on this tenor than the alto I had tried earlier, but it still didn't feel as smooth as my 56 year old Conn 10M! I do see some improvement over the Knight alto i tried, but overall, I still wasn't very impressed. It's exactly what saxguy said, " a dressed up intermediate (at best) sax".

        Reply To Post Yahoo!


      29. by barisaxplayer
        (3 posts)

        10 years ago

        Re: Cannonball Sax's

        There's a lot of quick shots against a CB here... I've been hearing the global big bell for the last 3 years, and had the opportunity to play it as well. I don't know what you guys have been hearing, but the horns I hear sound dang close to a Martin. The action is fast, and the intonation is just fine. In fact, the intonation is **** good. This is from having seen and heard about 10 of these horns play for 3 years. If you are having intonation problems on a pro yani, yamaha, or cannonball, you need more practice, and stop slamming good horns because you lack the experience to play them well. I have played a yamaha 62 for the last 7 years and it plays almost perfectly in tune(goes 5 cents sharp from mid d-g) with very little emb. adjustment. I found the same thing with the people who play the cannonballs. If you don't like the sound, maybe you need to try a different mouthpiece. My runyon makes my 62 boom even bigger than a cannonball and dang close to a martin, but when placed on a cannonball, reduces that big sound drastically. When these horns are shipped, they usually sustain damage. Those of you nailing CBs, have you had your dealer that got it for you give it a look see to see if everything was still seating and set right?

        Reply To Post


      30. by connsaxman_jim
        (2336 posts)

        10 years ago

        Re: Cannonball Sax's

        First of all, I have been playing saxophone since I was 9 years old, and I am now 31, so my experience and ability as a player is not in question here. I've played a few different Cannonballs, from the Knight of a few years ago to the Big Bell Global Series and the Mad Meg unlaquered model. The quality and craftsmenship of these horns is definately lacking for the price. They are NOT pro quality by any means. They need frequent maintenance and adjusting. When the horn is properly adjusted, the intonation isn't so bad, but they need to be adjusted ALL THE TIME! I don't think they sound good. I thought the big bell would give it a nice big brassy sound, but I thought it sounded really thin. It sounds nothing like my vintage 10M, or my Super 20. Although they're good horns and I'm NOT knocking them whatsoever, I've never considered Martin to be one of the better sounding horns; especially when compaired to a Conn or a King, I didn't think the Cannonball sounded anything like a Martin. It sounded more like a Yamaha Z to me; with that tinny, hollow Asian sound. As for volume and projection? It doesn't even begin to project like my 10M even with 4 pairs of panties from the girls in my audience stuffed in the bell!

        Reply To Post Yahoo!


      31. by barisaxplayer
        (3 posts)

        10 years ago

        Re: Cannonball Sax's

        If you're having these problems with cannonballs something has gotta be wrong. Like I said- I have seen about 10 of these in action for 3 years, intonation, sound, and durability are all great. Durability can occasionally be an issue, but it's not frequent that it will come up. Making sure that they are checked up after delivery is key, they will often be a bit messed up after flight delivery. My response was in anger earlier because I have seen and heard these a LOT and played on them quite a bit with and without a tuner in and out of bands. Everyone is being so quick to judge for the most part. Just make sure a good tech looks them over and they play and stay absolutely beautiful- several of the horns I see have never had to go to the shop, and they get banged against walls quite a bit!

        Reply To Post


      32. by baribri@verizon.net
        (3 posts)

        9 years ago

        Re: Cannonball Sax's

        Just a thought to all of the pontificators out there knocking the CB's. Just saw and talked to Paquito D'Rivera recently, he gave up his Yamaha for a Cannoball big bell global black and he sounds even more awesome on it. Even if he got it for nothing this is one player that would not sacrifice an iota of sound quality for a free horn! He feels these horns are awesome and that is off the record, he didn't get the deal like Gerald Albright must have because there is an Albright model but not a Rivera model.. I have yet to play a big bell global that wasn't a great player and NOT intermediate sounding at all. I am not an amatuer I gig with many well known bands so please don't think these are student rantings!

        Reply To Post


      33. by EL Seano
        (255 posts)

        9 years ago

        Re: Cannonball Sax's

        James Carter likes Cannonball. James is awesome. Cannonballs must be awesome :-)

        Reply To Post


      34. by AdamL
        (6 posts)

        8 years ago

        The Sax Shop in Evanston-Good but NO ANGELS

        FYI-For years, all of Fred Hemke's Northwestern University sax students were told (by the captain of the ship) to go down to The Sax Shop in Evanston, and (AND I CRINGE) TRADE IN OUR BEAUTIFUL MARK VI SAXES PLUS $$ FOR THE NEW MARK VII'S. Now there was no gun to our heads,but when you are a freshman at music school. and the head honcho says get a 7, well, let's just say we were under pressure to comply. We were impressionable at that age, and got taken advantage of by our teachers and the staff at The sax shop. I know of at least 50 kids within a year of me, you had the exact same experience. So Bobby Black, wherever you are, do the right thing. Give us Northwestern University sax majors back our 6's plus money for whatever lesser instrument we are surely settling for today. p.s. for those of you out there who take everything seriously...I do not expect this exchange to happen

        Reply To Post


      35. by oldtenorpicker
        (5 posts)

        3 years ago

        Re: The Sax Shop in Evanston-Good but NO ANGELS

        Although this is an old post, I still want to reply to it. I had the same experience with my college clarinet teacher, who insisted that we all play Buffet R-13 clarinets. At the time, I was playing a Selmer CT, and liked the horn. I had no money for a new horn, so switched my major instrument to flute to avoid confrontation. Later on, I found a big bore Leblanc that I liked the sound of, and sold my CT. Probably should have kept the CT and the Leblanc. I did trade a MarkVI for a Mark VII, and for a while I liked the VII just fine, although I seem to remember some clumsiness with the larger spatula keys. For me, the bottom line is the matchup between the horn, mouthpiece, and reed choices. It's not easy to find, and takes some investment to do. At one point I bought almost $500 worth of reeds, and systematically tested them on my Herb Couf Keilwerth, with all my available mouthpieces. About 12 of them. I kept a recording of my playing for each combination, a paper chart for comments, and organized all this on my computer for future reference. The results were surprising, not at all what I had expected, and my final choices were not what I thought they would be. The reeds turned out to make the most difference in both sound and projection. The mouthpieces came in second, and the horn remained the same. It occurred to me that the combinations of these three components are probably endless. It taught me to not make judgment on a horn hastily. The "matchup" is the most critical part of all of this.

        Reply To Post


    2. by saxguy007
      (1 post)

      9 years ago

      Re: Cannonball Sax's

      The original poster's query long ago elicited the predictable flurry of diverse opinions about Cannonballs, which then even more predictably degenerated into chest-beating commentary about other horns and other peoples' opinions. One item conspicuously absent from previous posts is the fact that the quality of CB saxes has improved over time from their original offerings to the current stone series. From testimony from other players (even those who like CBs), as well as even the local CB dealer (who is also a technician), it is apparent that the early CB offerings left a lot to be desired, such as the issue with key metal that is too soft. That has since been corrected in the newer models. I was skeptical of even wasting time trying any made in Taiwan horn, but on a lark, I tried some CB tenors at a local dealer early this year. Most finishes sounded nice, but didn't really do anything for me relative to the selmer and yamaha axes I already have. The black nickel finish model, however, grabbed me for its full sultry sound. I bought it and it has become my main gig horn. I won't demean the opinions of other players here, who are probably honestly reporting their disappointment with cannonball horns. In fact, that criticism is at least INFORMED. Many sax forum trolls knock horns they've never ever tried and just sing the praises of their favorite axe. I'm just happy to say that I found a winning specimen with smooth key action, impeccable intonation, and a tone color that really really pleased me, at a price a fraction of that of the big name horns. The alignment and adjustment have remained true after scores of rehearsals and gigs. To say that the CB horn I play is not a "professional horn" strikes me as plain silly considering I get compliments on the sound I get all the time at gigs and concerts, my phone keeps ringing. It sounds even more silly in light of the number of elite players who are now playing and endorsing them, such as Pete "Unforgettable" Christlieb. Might I like a $4-5k new offering from a big name even more? Maybe. I'm sure some of the top of the line Selmers and Yani's etc are fantastic horns, but I can't justify spending thousands more, when I enjoy the sound I'm getting now with my newer CB. I would at least recommend someone try one of the newer models.

      Reply To Post


      1. by chiefs_55
        (3 posts)

        9 years ago

        Re: Cannonball Sax's

        Guys, stop arguing about horns that are irrellevant. The VI is a great horn, great action, tone, and evenness of sound. The old 10Ms, and Old Top Hats and Cane sound great too. Also, the King Supers/Zephyrs sound great. Keilwerths I think have a great sound. But please, Cannonballs are chinese horns, they're junk. They are not expensive horns, unless you can't afford a good horn. I personally bought a great Horn on EBAY, a Beuscher I paid $320 for, spent another $650 to restore, and I wouldn't trade it for any Cannonball. I would play on any Yamaha 61 series (not a 62), or a custom Z. I won't even touch a CB. My professionall Opinion. I play Jazz, I also play classical bassoon. The SAX IS NOT A CLASSICAL INSTRUMENT! any more than the electric guitar is symphonic. But I love to play Jazz on it. CBs Suck!

        Reply To Post


        1. by chiefs_55
          (3 posts)

          9 years ago

          Re: Cannonball Sax's

          Sorry I missed other horns worth wasting space on: *BAs and Super BAs *SMLs *older Conns (any with Rolled Tone Holes) *Martins (several top models with great tone) Thanks, no more talk about stinky CBs Chief

          Reply To Post


          1. by Sax Mom
            (964 posts)

            9 years ago

            Re: Cannonball Sax's

            Chiefs_55, In all fairness, I don't believe you should knock all cannonballs with one load of shot. There are other Saxquest persons here who have tried the newer models, and find them to be much better than the earlier ones. People can learn, and the brand can improve. I won't part with my vintage Conns, but neither will I slam a brand that seems to have grown in favor among other respected players without extensive first-hand experience.

            Reply To Post


          2. by connsaxman_jim
            (2336 posts)

            9 years ago

            Re: Cannonball Sax's

            Since I wrote my first post on the Cannonballs, I have tried a couple newer horns that I really liked. The first couple Cannonballs that I tried did not impress me at all. They just had a cheap, Asian, student horn feel, and the sound was very disappointing. I expected the horn to have a full, bright sound with a lot of projection. It sounded thin and hollow. The first horn that I played was an alto. Over a year later, and after reading several great reviews from other players, I decided to give CB another shot. I played a Mad Meg unlacquered brass tenor. Although I'm not a big fan of unlacquered brass saxophones, this model was on loan to me for the weekend. I really put it to the test; trying a few different mouthpieces and set-ups. The sax just screamed, and played very well. I was impressed. Then, a couple months later I tested a few different altos with an Otto Link Tone Edge hard rubber mouthpiece. One of the horns that I tested was a new silver Cannonball stone series horn. I fell in love with this sax almost instantly and couldn't put it down. It had the sound of a vintage King Silversonic, with an action more like a Selmer Mark VI! The high end was crisp and rang like a bell. There was also a bit of a debate between myself and another saxquest member about the way the Cannonball annealed their brass and manufactured their horns. The debate generated a friendly response from the vice president of Cannonball explaining their manufacturing process and the annealing process (I'm an engineer, so I get interested in this type of thing) The fact that the VP took the time to reply to my post said a lot to me about their dedication and committment to making quality instruments. After my more recent experiences with Cannonball, I would definately recommend their saxophones, and I would consider buying one myself. I'm pretty attached to my old Conns though for the time being.

            Reply To Post Yahoo!


          3. by saxophonik
            (73 posts)

            9 years ago

            Re: Cannonball Sax's

            Please forgive me if this was already brought up and I just missed it: Didn't the guys from Tower Of Power, at least at one time, rip it up with Cannonball saxes? (If I'm wrong, I'll double check my info. source)

            Reply To Post


        2. by altosaxplayer01
          (1 post)

          8 years ago

          Re: Cannonball Sax's

          I stopped readeing after the first couple of insane posts. I have been the proud owner of two cannonball saxes for 5 years now. I own a Mad Meg Big Bell Alto(no laquer)and The Raven(brushed nickle plate) Stone Series Tenor Sax. I got my alto fist. I went to our local music store in Austin Tx with the intent on giving up $4000 on a new Selmer Paris Series III Alto. That is untill I played on the Mad Meg. Holy crap. It blew me away. It was perfectly in tune throughout the whole register and sang with a unique pitch. I just had to have it and only forked over $1600! I usually only went for the well known name brand stuff, not some group called Cannonball(has nothing to do with CBall Aderly!!!!). There were some pitfalls, but not in the sound. They had a little bit of work to do with key support in certain areas, something that the series III from selmer had perfected. Well two years later my call was heard and they came out with the new stone series.OMG!!!! The best saxophones I had ever played. I just had to sell my old Six alto to get three of their new horns. They just kicked selmers butt. Dont take it from me though. FYI, their horns are in such high demand right now, that there is a 3 moth wait for a new one!! Every saxophone player should at least try one. They are truly unique. Most badass looking horns suck(LA Sax America Stripe). But this is the best sax manufactured in the USA and boasts some awesome finishes. Take a look your self at www.cannonballmusic.com . THESE HORNS HAVE NOTHING TO DO WITH CANNONBALL ADERLY!!! Its a renaissance thing.

          Reply To Post


          1. by wsax2
            (1 post)

            8 years ago

            Cannonball Saxes

            I bought a Stone Series alto about a month ago as a back-up for the Selmer Mark VII which I've been playing for the past 20 years. I know the VIIs have an uneven reputation, which may be deserved, but overall I've been happy with mine, though I've found it a little thin in the high end. The Cannonball cost roughly half of what it would cost to get something comparable to the Selmer, be it another Selmer, a top of the line Yamaha, Keilworth or Yanagisawa. When I bought it, I didn't purchase it with the idea that it would be as good as or better than the Selmer for half the price. After playing it for a month, I would have to say that so far, it has proven to be a good value for the money. Time will tell if it is durable, but the tone of the black nickel model, while not being quite as open or flexible as the Selmer, is warm and appealing, the action reasonably responsive, and the intonation superior to the Selmer. And while the sound and action are clearly more important than the looks of a horn, it is stunning to behold. So, for an instrument that cost half of what I'd expect to pay for either a vintage or new top of the line instrument, my opinion is that at least so far, it's been a good buy.

            Reply To Post


            1. by musicplay
              (1 post)

              8 years ago

              Re: Cannonball Saxes

              Hi All, I just registered for the board. I am a former High School Band Instructor, Sax major, have played professionally on and off for over 35 years. Until about one year ago, I was an alto player who had rarely played tenor but always wanted one. I have played a King Super 20 Silversonic alto since 1967 and it is one awesome instrument. I deerly love that horn and would not exchange it for anything. But about a year ago I purchased my first tenor which is a Cannonball black nickel with gold lacquer keys. Before the purchase I spoke to the owner of the company via email and asked the question about Cannonball Adderley. I was told the horns have nothing to do with him although they did consider him a great player and the Super 20 a great horn and that both had some influence. Regardless, I do think the Cannonball horns have some similarity to the Super 20's in the character of the sound. I have found my tenor to be a fantastic horn. My only complaint is that I haven't had enough time to play it to build the tone I really want. I think it is more the responsibility of the player to develop an embouchure on the right mouthpiece for the horn to get the most out of it. There'll never be a consensus from the majority of sax players that any one horn is the be all and end all of horns, but I feel the Cannonball is a well made, beautiful sounding, beautiful looking instrument for the money. With the right mouthpiece and reed and embouchure it just might be the best horn available at any price.

              Reply To Post


          2. by BbWally
            (2 posts)

            8 years ago

            Re: Cannonball Sax's

            Are there any opinions about the Baritone CB? I heard that they are OUTSTANDING|! List is about $5500.00

            Reply To Post


            1. by barisaxytrumpet
              (1 post)

              8 years ago

              Re: Cannonball Sax's

              ive owned a CB bari for about a month now and it is outstanding!!! its a black ice with silver keys and it makes the greatest tone ever!

              Reply To Post


              1. by tuffsax
                (1 post)

                8 years ago

                Re: Cannonball Sax's

                I have played professionally since I was 15 years old (I am 55 as of this writting). I started with Selmer and remained a loyal artist for many years. However I found carrying around MVI for everyday use kindof troubling (they are getting expensive); so I purchased a CB alto tenor and soprano and then another alto for a back up set. With a Berg Larson or any other higher grade mouthpiece I have found the cb to be just as good and in some places better than the Selmer. If you are looking for a great horn that will serve you a long time (mine have been all over the country and out of the country) many times and still look and play great. CB offers a great alternative case that works better than the one issued with your purchase. Lastly I have found the owners of CB to be some of the most pleasant people with which to work: they answer you quickly and professionally. I left feeling like they thought I was doing them a favor letting them service me rather than they were doing me a favor by being a salesperson. I still play the MVI and selmers occassionally but when I hit the road (157 shows a year) The CBs are with me. DT

                Reply To Post


                1. by mussaxman
                  (1 post)

                  8 years ago

                  Re: Cannonball Sax's

                  For those who are interested, there are many excellent sax players who use the cannonball horns and I have heard many of them in concert or on recordings. They sound great on their Cannonball horns. Some of those players are: (1) Gerald Albright, (2) Eric Darius - a local Tampa/St. Pete guy, (3) Charles McPherson - a great bob player, (4) Jeff Kashiwa, and (5) Pete Christlieb - of "Tonight Show" fame - says about the Cannonball saxes, "I've been going back and forth between a Mark VI* and a Balanced Action* for years, and this is the first horn in 20 years I've played that is comparable in sound and feel to either one." As far as an earlier comment regarding asking a professor of saxophone what he/she thinks of the Cannonball horns, below you will find a quote from Dr. Ray Smith of Brigham Young University, "There are a number of good horns out there not, but the Stone Series is really something special. I've never played a horn that was so resonant. It has a robust, rich sound that vibrates like crazy. The response is good from bottom to top, but the altissimo is especially impressive. As one who finds himself in the recording environment frequently, I particularly appreciate the excellent intonation of this instrument." Now, as for me...I certainly am not putting myself on the same level as the above mentioned players; however, I have been playing professionally for 23 years and have recently bought a cannonball alto Stone Series and I absolutely love this horn. The tone to me is the most important thing and the Cannonball did not disappoint me. Say what you will about the Cannonball, but as for me and the previously mentioned musicians, Cannonball delivers the goods! Have a great day everyone!

                  Reply To Post


                2. by Ron_mooney
                  (8 posts)

                  8 years ago

                  I love my cannonball.

                  I bought my cannonball on the recommendation of an instructor of 33 years. I had played several types of alto saxophones, but had never tried a cannonball. Since I was having it shipped in, it was a leap of faith. I have NEVER regretted it. With a good, stiff reed (Hemke 3 was my favorite) and a black sock in the bell, it has a beautiful, mellow sound that will blend wonderfully with french horns in a concert band. But yank out the sock and hold off on the timidity and you can get a nice, bright, jazzy sound as well.

                  Reply To Post


                3. by Sax Mom
                  (964 posts)

                  8 years ago

                  Re: I love my cannonball.

                  I prefer purple to black, still dark, but with a little bit of sassy rolled in!

                  Reply To Post


              2. by BbWally
                (2 posts)

                8 years ago

                Re: Cannonball Sax's

                I previously posted a comment about a CB Baritone that I ordered in Boca Raton Florids. The original delivery date was to be December 17,2006. I just received a forward date of March 2006. Cannonball's are in great demand. I was told that the delivery time for orders now may be up to a year. My Guru confirms that it will be well worth waiting for. Now I play a Yamaha YBS62. Like it alot, but I am very curious to see how good the CB will be. Wally

                Reply To Post


            2. by MatteSelmerSeriesii
              (2 posts)

              8 years ago

              Re: Cannonball Sax's

              Do not buy a cannonball. They look very tacky and play like crap. There is a reason why you don't see any college professors playing them or students. They are bad. Go with a Yamaha or Selmer. I play Selmer.

              Reply To Post


              1. by Christian Anderson
                (73 posts)

                8 years ago

                Re: Cannonball Sax's

                I know several people who play on cannonball's first of all the ergonomics are just plain painful, even my old conn's are better spaced. The tone that i get and others that i know is very harsh and abrasive, not sweet and clean like most people prefer. It could be an okay horn for a student but for someone who plans to make money playing, I don't see how it could be found appealing to listen to.

                Reply To Post


                1. by CBsaxer
                  (2 posts)

                  8 years ago

                  Re: Cannonball Sax's

                  I'm a tenor player and first off, I'm rather touched by everyone's incredible (sometimes blind) devotion to different sax companies. The sax itself isn't as much an issue as the mouthpiece, reed, and person playing it. Also, I realize that Selmers are good horns, there's just a problem that they don't have much room to challenge a CB financially. if I had a spare $6000, sure I'd look into selmer. But over $2000 is already hard enough to handle. I compared a Yamaha Custom Z tenor to a few CBs, finding that there are good and bad horns coming out of the company. The black nickel plate gets a big tone, but not too mellow. My choice? The all gold "stone series" tenor stole my heart with a warm and "fat" tone that could be mellowed out providing you had a good mouthpiece (or good neck since they come with two now). With a good old pre-babbit HR link (if you're lucky enough to have one :D) will give you a pretty amazing sound on a CB. And as for the CB altos? I am not a fan of 'em.

                  Reply To Post


              2. by chovee
                (1 post)

                8 years ago

                Re: Cannonball Sax's

                Dear, MatteSelmerSeriesii you make a very convincing and constructive argument. I particularly like the part about the use of your helpful vocabulary, "crap" and "bad, now thats usefull. I think its pretty annoying how someone askes a genuine question and all the help to be found is :"________ saxophones suck". Can you actually trust someone who uses the word suck. I play a Cannonball A1 SLS. Would I like a Selmer Reference? Hell yes. Im I dissapointed that I saved two grand. No. Its all in the player. Ive bested Mark VI's, Ive been eaten by a Bundy II.

                Reply To Post


                1. by saxmachine777
                  (57 posts)

                  8 years ago

                  Re: Cannonball Sax's

                  "I've bested Mark VI's, I've been eaten by a Bundy II." ~chovee Man, I love that. I think I want that for a signature on a forum that uses signatures. Amen, dude.

                  Reply To Post AIM


              3. by gvtek
                (1 post)

                8 years ago

                Re: Cannonball Saxes

                I just don't understand how you people can honestly sit here and say they're the greatest thing since sliced bread. Have you played on a Conn Naked Lady, a Cigar Cutter, or a Super (Balanced) Action?? Have you Played on a Yani, or on a VI, or even on a vintage Martin. The answer to almost all of these questions for most of you is 'no'. So, simply put, since you have tried maybe a couple of Bundys, and Yamaha 23s. Most people probably posting in this forum and not even touched or even known that they have SEEN a Mark VI. Oh, and for you idiots out there that will most likely try posting the question: "So have you played on all those horns you listed?" Just don't. Oh, and the answer is yes. I have had the pleasure of playing on many vintage horns. I absolutely love my 1952 Super Action. And I'm not bashing a specific person here, actually I'm not bashing at all. I'm just asking for someone to be themselves. So, all I ask, is that people stop talking about things that they have yet to experience. Shoot, I'm a virgin, you don't see me talking about sex all the time, right?

                Reply To Post


                1. by CBsaxer
                  (2 posts)

                  8 years ago

                  Re: Cannonball Saxes

                  Hey, I've played a lot myself. Conn Naked Lady, King Zephyr and Super 20, Mark VI, Selmer SBA, Buescher 400, Martin, Yamaha, Yanagisawa. Yes, I've been around the block. I'm sure we're not all saying Cannonball is the best. It's just what we've found is the best for the price. I love all those vintage horns and some modern ones. Just, I'd like to keep my car...

                  Reply To Post


              4. by saxchica
                (6 posts)

                8 years ago

                Re: Cannonball Sax's

                Oh my god! I purchased a Cannonball professional alto saxophone at Meyer Music in Grand Rapids, Michigan. It is the best saxophone I have ever played in my entire life. My Cannonball is the A5 Ice B, and it has charcoal/hematite satin finish, Celtic etchings, jasper keys, a high F# key, and a crocodile skin case. It is ideal for playing at church, in jazz band, and for the heck of it. I payed $1,569.99 for my sax, and I think that is a far better deal than a Yanagasawa, a Selmer Mark VII, a Yamaha professional, or a L.A. Sax. If you saxophonists only want the best quality, I suggest you try a Cannonball Big Bell Professional model like mine!!

                Reply To Post


                1. by badasoccergoalie
                  (3 posts)

                  7 years ago

                  Re: Cannonball Sax's

                  I have seen a lot of interesting reviews and responses in here and thought I would put my own two cents. First off when you talk about the horns make sure you TRY them. I have heard so much talk and such about the Mark VI and when I finally got to try one when I was actually trying out a Conn Chu Berry I have to say the hype lead me to nothing. Though it has amazing intonation sounds great, and feels great by itself compared to others I felt that my old piece of junk bundy could get an almost as good sound. My point to all of this is that no sax is going to work a miracle for your playing in such a way that you will go professional in an instant. Now in the aspect of the Cannonball saxes I have to say I really like them. After being able to play a Mark VI I could compare them better. (Btw it was a Stone series unlaquered CB FYI) I can see how the Selmer may have been better but not a good $2500 worth especially if you are not a working professional. If you were and had the money buying the VI would be a must in your line of work your tone landing you gigs and such. But for all of you people who don't have the extra cash, check out a CB because they are right up there with the pros. P.S I also tried a Yani Pro and was not impressed very much past my old school bundy. I also played each of these horns with the same mouthpiece and reed.

                  Reply To Post


                  1. by badasoccergoalie
                    (3 posts)

                    7 years ago

                    Re: Cannonball Sax's

                    Also to add to this I also had to use a SCHOOL Yamaha beginner alto recently which had wires holding the key guards on and when I started to play my friend ran into the room wondering if I had gotten a brand new sax. Just goes to show that some saxes act different than others of the very same model.=)

                    Reply To Post


                    1. by Sax Mom
                      (964 posts)

                      7 years ago

                      Re: Cannonball Sax's

                      So, did you just say that you sounded better on the rigged-up school Yamaha than your old Bundy?

                      Reply To Post


                    2. by badasoccergoalie
                      (3 posts)

                      7 years ago

                      Re: Cannonball Sax's

                      Exactly. I think that crap rigged begginer Yamaha might be the best sax ive played, at least tone wise. You have to try out a few of a brand just to make sure it wasnt a horn that was a fluke of some kind. Same with my Bundy, I had someone recently try it and was amazed with the sound and feel they got out of it.

                      Reply To Post


                    3. by saxchica
                      (6 posts)

                      7 years ago

                      Re: Cannonball Sax's

                      You are mental! I have tried a Yamaha school tenor, and it sounded like sustained farting! The Cannonball A5 Ice B that I have is the bomb, and I am going to eventually get an Otto Link gold-plated mouthpiece for it. It will sound even better than before that way. I think that a mouthpiece would have a great impact on the instrument's tone, and you shouldn't have such a prejudiced personality about Cannonballs. That's what this website is all about! It's all about Cannonballs, not other saxes. Come on! If you think Cannonballs are trash, you are sick in the head. Try one with a metal mouthpiece. .

                      Reply To Post


                  2. by personified
                    (1 post)

                    7 years ago

                    Re: Cannonball Sax's

                    I own one of the tenor big bell series Cannon Ball. I have come to find out that I am a full note out. I am back from a 20 year break and thought it might be my lip. However I have been trying to change to no avail. I am believe the horn itself is out of tune. I took it back to where I purchased it and the tech tried to adjust it with no luck. Even exchanged one of the necks trying to miss and match. I am thinking a different mouthpiece may help. However I feel it should be in tune. If not I can always use the mouthpiece on another sax. It is disappointing to pay this kind of money to only find out it is not in tune. I did learn something by a tuner when purchasing the next one. I have also had a chance to listen to some of the older horns since purchasing my horn. I must say they do seem to have a deeper sound. I am not sure you all will think of me as an expert. However, I do have one of the CB horns.

                    Reply To Post


                2. by cettle
                  (2 posts)

                  7 years ago

                  Re: Cannonball Sax's

                  Ok....here's my two cents...take it or leave it. One of the music stores in my area pushes the Cannonball horns hard....especially to middle school and high school students. I ask my students to talk to me before purchasing anything but many of their friends come home with Cannonballs...black and silver laquer....so cool to the kids. I've played the cannonball and I sound stuffy on it (maybe more time and mouthpiece adjustment would help) but many of my students sound great! My one problem with the Cannonball is wear and tear. I've seen so many adjustment problems with Cannonball horns....the horn is in the shop more than in the practice room. Something for the cannonball company to work on I suppose. These are my obsevations of these horns but if it works for others that's great!

                  Reply To Post


                  1. by saxchica
                    (6 posts)

                    7 years ago

                    Re: Cannonball Sax's

                    You're right; middle school and high school students with optimistic personalities think that Cannonball saxophones are cool. I think that it sounds stuffy when you just get out a new reed, but as I said before, you can always try an Otto Link mouthpiece, or another metal mouthpiece. Just take your time to try one of those gems, and you will sound lovely like Charlie Parker, Paul Desmond, or John Coltrane. How about it? Basically, it depends on the mouthpiece and reed condition. Try a metal mouthpiece, and you'll be fine, fellas!

                    Reply To Post


                    1. by CountSpatula
                      (602 posts)

                      7 years ago

                      Re: Cannonball Sax's

                      Or you can find a nice vintage horn (like a Buescher alto) that plays fine with any mouthpiece (that's not deformed) and mines pretty reliable. The "fat neck," enlarged bell, resonance stone, cool laquer...so much hype it gives me a headache...

                      Reply To Post AIM


                    2. by saxmachine777
                      (57 posts)

                      7 years ago

                      Re: Cannonball Sax's

                      Saxchica, you are out of your element. It's pointless to bash proven horns in order to bolster horns with little history. Additionally, after discounting vintage horns like the popular old Selmer models, you say that with a CB horn you'll sound "like Charlie Parker, Paul Desmond, or John Coltrane," who played and old King, Selmer, Selmer, respectively. A couple of posts back you tossed these aside as footnotes in the story of the Canonball Big Bell. Also, learn specifics about mouthpieces so you can more precisely express your point. Slow your roll.

                      Reply To Post AIM


                      1. by aimeejs
                        (2 posts)

                        7 years ago

                        Re: Cannonball Sax's

                        I think that a lot of you are just stubborn, and forgive me, but really quite pretentious, which is really quite embabarassing considering that i am only 17 but seem to have a far more open view about this than many of you. I own a connonball professional big bell stone series alto in black nickel and real silver key work, and I spent weeks trying out every sax you can think of before buying it. I love my sax. I am not saying it is the best sax by no means, but with everything in consideration including price, it worked out best for me, and many people i know. I have lessons with one of the top teachers in britain at the royal academy, and cannonballs are rare over here and he knew little about them, but he loves playing my sax and believesd it plays beautifully. Cannonballs are something different, so i completely disagree with this 'lack of character' rubbish. The sound is like nothing else, and if you are getting a 'tinny' sound, it obvious just isn't right for you. When played properly with some understanding of the horn, it is an absolute joy to play, and definately stands out. Just because you have to work a bit harder doesn't make it beneith the rest. Whats the fun in playing a horn that so many people play and sound so similar on, and that anyone can make a decent sound on? That doesn't make a decent saxophonist. As some one said before, listen to New Century Sax quartet and you will see what us supporters of cannonball are saying! And for those of you who are raving on about selmer... Yes selmer saxes are good, but they are becoming the standard now, not anything special. I happen to know that cannonball saxes were started by two of the researchers of selmer, because selmer were not willing to make the changes and improvements to their horns, because they already had their reputation, so they thought there was no need to take the effort, time and pay the expensive to improve their saxes. So Cannonball was started, and the new ideas were put into these horns. Some of these posts are from 2004. Cannonball are constantly improving their instruments and making changes, and if you look at the more recent replies, it is mostly positive praise being said. So i suggest you try a new cannonball, with all of the improvements now and wise up! If you look at a connonball today, you will realise it is great value for money. It is finished so nicely, with almost silent key work, double armed, two crooks, rounded octave key, palm keys that are molded to the shape of your hand perfectly...etc it is the most comfortable sax to play, one of the best sounds when played well, and lets be honest, it looks awesome. I think we might just have to accept that there is no 'best' sax. For example, In my opinion yanagisawa make nasty altos with plasticy finishes, but great sopranos, the different makes have different fortés. Your sax is something personal to you. Its a matter of personal preference. If it works for you then thats great and who has the right to tell you its rubbish. It would be a bit weird if we all played the same horn. I only payed £1200 for my cannonball, i don't know what that is in dolars, but it was worth every penny.

                        Reply To Post


                      2. by saxchica
                        (6 posts)

                        7 years ago

                        Re: Cannonball Sax's

                        You are absolutely right, Aimee! I'm happy for you! I have never had one lesson on sax in my life; I taught myself how to play when I was 12, just finished 5th grade. I am totally with you about a rare brand like Cannonball being the top line. £1200=$1996.44, so that's adequate. I got my Cannonball slightly used at Meyer Music in Grand Rapids. I test-played it, and I could not BELIEVE the tone and feel of it compared to my 1914 nickel-plated C.G. Conn Limited, which was an heirloom instrument. What I mean by heirloom is that it was my maternal grandfather's when he was in high school, then my aunt played it for a few years and didn't stay with it, then my other aunt (my mother's "baby" sister) played it, and loved it. It had lots of problems with the low notes, it needed new pads, new lacquer, new keys, and lots of other problems I couldn't diagnose. It would have cost me $400-$500 to get the whole darn Conn refurbished adequately, so I think that purchasing the Cannonball was a very logical thing for me to do, as it is for you fellas who want a quality instrument that won't burn a hole in your wallet! That's why I didn't blow my dough on a Yanagisawa or a Selmer Mark VI or VII or a different "professional" model! Cannonball is the BOMB!

                        Reply To Post


                      3. by CountSpatula
                        (602 posts)

                        7 years ago

                        Re: Cannonball Sax's

                        "Just because you have to work a bit harder doesn't make it beneith the rest. Whats the fun in playing a horn that so many people play and sound so similar on, and that anyone can make a decent sound on? That doesn't make a decent saxophonist." What's wrong with playing an easier horn? That seems to me like saying whats the point in a normal reed, lets play on 5s cuz soft reeds are too easy!!! And what horn do people sound similar on?? Out of all the professionals that play Mark VIs do they sound the same? David Sanborn sounds no where near Phil Woods. I have tried a Cannonball. I still think they're ranked below P. Mauriat and Yamaha, definitely no contest between that and my TH&C or my old reference 54. It just sounded harsh and bright but yeah it has a lot of power but I get plenty of that already, I leave that to my mouthpiece. I don't think it looks awsome either...I prefer the vintage look :) And sorry saxchica, but anyone telling everyone "you can sound like parker or coltrane..." you kidding me...

                        Reply To Post AIM


                      4. by saxchica
                        (6 posts)

                        7 years ago

                        Re: Cannonball Sax's

                        I think you have a cerebral challenge because you ranked a very adequate horn below P. You're very messed in the head, and I want you to shut up about your opinionated mimicries and cynicism! I'm totally being logical about the Cannonball, and it's just the match for me. You just don't care for it because it doesn't suit your style, Count Spatula! I'm going to major in jazz saxophone performance at Aquinas College, and I think that my horn, as I said it, is adequate! Keep your rubbish comments yourself, why don't you!

                        Reply To Post


                      5. by aimeejs
                        (2 posts)

                        7 years ago

                        Re: Cannonball Sax's

                        Wow guys! Count Spatula, i think you need to breath. if you read what i said without thinking the world is ganging up on you, you might actually understand what i said. Your comment about the reeds is kinda irrelevent, as what i was saying is that cannonball saxes tend to need a bit more perseverence than some saxes, because they aren't as 'easy' to find the sound you want, but once you find it, nothing will feel the same again! It doesn't mean i was saying that i'm hard core cos i play a cannonball... i mean really, that would be silly. I just find you can get a sound with far more depth to it, and when you are constantly being graded and oushed, this is what you need. For some one like me who is doing a degree in sax, i need a horn that has a versatile sound. I specialise in both jazz and classical equally, and so with this sax (i have tried many) I can get both sounds not just by changing the mouth piece, but also by changing the crooks that cannonball so kindly provide, and by using techneques that i am being taught. I get the feeling you are one of those people who doesn't like change, and maybe people like saxchica and i who are majoring in sax at the moment are at that crucial point of finding a sax that suits us. And the cannonball is it for us. SO THERE. Everbody loves vintage horns, how can anyone not. But a vintage sax is great for jazz, but would not be right for me as it would not be a good sound for classical as well as jazz. I recently played a rudy wiedoeft piece in a recital, and i found the cannonball sax just as appropriate as my friends vintage sax. I then went straight from that piece to a sonata, and the contrast worked nicely. So don't tell us that our horns aren't good enough when it works well for us. Stick to what you know if you like, but it is a fact that cannonball are coming up with the latest improved features today, and saxes as a whole are certainly not perfect instruments and there is a lot of room for improvements, and cannonball seem to be the only ones who are determined to continue these improvements. ( Check out their new crook on the website. ) Its a shame that you are being so ignorant about it all, because i think everyone knows that your sax is something personal to you, there is no 'best' sax. If i thought a selmer was better than a cannonball, i would have bought one, but i preffered the cannonball. Is that so bad? I think it is also important to remember that some guy asked a genuine question 3 years ago, and hasn't really been helped all that much by us. Its quite funny really! Please don't think i am being really harsh or anything, i'm really not usually an argumentative person! I'm just voicing my oppinion to everyone who hates cannonball! One more thing... If you haven't tried a cannonball ball sax in the last year or so, do it! Because they have improved so much now and it is almost like we are talking about completely different instruments. For example, people keep saying how they are unreliable and about the key work was nasty soft metal, when now they use really good stuff, mine are solid silver and have never needed any adjustments since the day i got it. In fact, i haven't had to take my sax in for anything over a year and a half later. My Yamaha tenor on the other hand... thats another story grr ha ha. Really don't like it. Saxicha, lets stick together!

                        Reply To Post


                      6. by CountSpatula
                        (602 posts)

                        7 years ago

                        Re: Cannonball Sax's

                        Thank you for explaining what you meant about the horn, I mis-understood it. I still disagree with most of what you say. Vintage horns can't be used for classical? My teacher who has his fancy degrees in music uses a Selmer Balanced Action. I've met many collegues who use Bueschers. And I don't see many horns as being versatile. I think thats more you and next your mouthpiece and then your horn. Cannonball has too much hype. Hell, even the horns that come in the local shop have super stiff action and usually require hours of adjustment according to the techs. I'm sorry if I don't think a simple stone on the neck and fancy pearls makes great improvements. Oh and the fancy colored horns...can't forget about that. Good luck in your majoring, and I hope your not relying on a simple saxophone doing it for you. And one last thing, Saxchica, are you saying Cannonball blows P. Mauriat out of the water? I can tell you even the guys here at SaxQuest recommend P. Mauriat over Cannonball (When they had one in stock I talked to them about it...) If your able to talk about how wonderful your Cannonballs are and how they can "Make you sound like Parker and Desmond..." I should be able to give my input too. Good luck and keep it swingin' - Tyler

                        Reply To Post AIM


                      7. by whatsasax
                        (1 post)

                        6 years ago

                        Re: Cannonball Sax's

                        hi ok well i have never played any sax ever, never even held one but i want to learn how to play just for fun and for me. i was reading all of the statements made by everyone and for everything and i found myself most interested in how passionate you and saxchica were about your degree in it and about your sax but you seemed very level headed as well and i was wondering if you would be so kind as to recommend something. anything really i figure that your very busy and so if you cant i will understand but thanks for your time in reading this if nothing else. Nate

                        Reply To Post


                      8. by CountSpatula
                        (602 posts)

                        6 years ago

                        Re: Cannonball Sax's

                        Get a teacher.

                        Reply To Post AIM


                    3. by saxchica
                      (6 posts)

                      7 years ago

                      Re: Cannonball Sax's

                      You are full of crap, saxmachine777! You're going straight to the devil! Who the hell are you to judge other people and tell them that they are out of their elements? Who the hell are you to tell them it's pointless? Slow your roll? What the hell kind of term is that, you son of a bitch? I love my Raven, so don't anybody try to convince me that other brands are better, because they are not! And don't ever tell me to slow my roll again!

                      Reply To Post


                    4. by CountSpatula
                      (602 posts)

                      7 years ago

                      Re: Cannonball Sax's

                      I don't know if many people will believe a Cannonball will beat out every Mark VI, Buescher, Conn, etc. But if you say so. I'm curious if you even played on many others. Man this thread is...firey hehe.

                      Reply To Post AIM


                    5. by chalazon
                      (547 posts)

                      7 years ago

                      Re: Cannonball Sax's

                      I'm a repair tech. and long time player (35 years). I've played on many, many different saxes. I find c.b.'s to be a very weak instrument. Lots of bling, but not much else..no resale value, I'm so not impressed. But, whatever floats your boat....

                      Reply To Post


                    6. by JBTSAX
                      (364 posts)

                      7 years ago

                      Re: Cannonball Sax's

                      Hi chalazon. Have you tried any of the recent Stone Series Models? They are by far the best saxes that Cannonball has produced to date. John

                      Reply To Post


                    7. by chalazon
                      (547 posts)

                      7 years ago

                      Re: Cannonball Sax's

                      Actually,jbt, I haven't had the opportunity to try the latest CB's.When the Jupiter horns first came out, they were abysmal..over the years their quality has steadily improved, and now they're a pretty decent student horn. (opinion)..so I would presume that the Cannonballs are following suite..I'd like to try one one of these days....by the way, I find your posts to be very informative..I've been playing sax for 35 years, now, and repairing them for twenty some, and one of the things I've discovered is that there are fellows out there who know more about this than I do. You do..thanks for all the lovely information..keep the faith

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                    8. by JBTSAX
                      (364 posts)

                      7 years ago

                      Re: Cannonball Sax's

                      On Wednesday night I had the opportunity to attend a master class and recital given by the New Century Saxophone Quartet at BYU. The virtuosity and musicianship of the group is simply amazing. They play Cannonball saxophones exclusively. What's more is that they are not given free saxophones in return for their endorsement of the instruments as is true with some other companies. Of course if they get one directly from the manufacturer they pay only the dealer cost since there is no dealer markup at that point. They are all playing on Raven series Cannonballs at the present time, but after spending a day with Tevis Laukat at the Salt Lake Cannonball headquarters they have each purchased a new stone series Cannonball to move up to. Information about the Quartet can be found at this link.

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                    9. by chalazon
                      (547 posts)

                      7 years ago

                      Re: Cannonball Sax's

                      I had the pleasure to see Tower of Power a few years ago..Front row center..both of the tenor players were playing CB's.

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                    10. by jamminCB
                      (6 posts)

                      7 years ago

                      Re: Cannonball Sax's

                      Here's how i see it....why don't yall shut up and go play some more......damn.....we're all musician's right??& Count.....maybe for YOU CB's arent the best....but with work.....you can get Whatever sound you want on a Cb.......most other saxes have just One type of sound(VI-foggy, Yam-Bright) with a CB you can reproduce both the sound of a VI or a YAM or a Buescher or a Conn...........

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                  2. by cuber
                    (653 posts)

                    6 years ago

                    Re: Cannonball Sax's

                    actually, mr. hotshot, parker is known for playing a 6m, not a king.

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                  3. by cuber
                    (653 posts)

                    6 years ago

                    Re: Cannonball Sax's

                    *that was to saxmachine777

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                  4. by se.hornrepair
                    (5 posts)

                    5 years ago

                    Re: Cannonball Sax's

                    Actually, Charlie Parker played both a Conn 6m and a King Super 20 as well as a few others, pending his financial/addiction circumstance at the time...

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                  5. by se.hornrepair
                    (5 posts)

                    5 years ago

                    Re: Cannonball Sax's

                    Now reguarding Cannonball saxophones, my dearest friend owns an example of the very first model tenor Cannonball produced and another friend owns several of the stone series horns. Cannonball instruments have come a very long way and should definitely be considered when new horn shopping.

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                  6. by cuber
                    (653 posts)

                    5 years ago

                    Re: Cannonball Sax's

                    parker was know for playing a 6m. king gave him a super20. the other stuff was what he could find while he was doped up, and hadnt sold for drug money. yet... why wont this thread die? it wouldnt be bad if it were, say, 100 posts shorter...

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                  7. by kdanielle08
                    (1 post)

                    5 years ago

                    Re: Cannonball Sax's

                    Hey guys, I'm only a sophomore in college as of this year, but I have been playing on a cannonball alto since my Junior year of high school and a cannonball tenor since my senior year of high school. Up til now I have not had a single problem with either one of them other then having a weak spring that triggers my high F# key in my tenor. But it's a very quick fix and you see it in all saxophones. I do agree with crap stock mouthpieces that they come with. I immediately bought Selmer C*'s before I even dared play on the ones that came with the cannonballs. They are okay for students but when you want to go professional and further your career you need to look into finding more appropriate mouth pieces. As for ligatures i am currently looking into buying a Rovner or Vandoren Optimum, does anyone one have any comments on those? I'm kinda at a loss and needing some heads up lol. Overall I really do love my cannonballs. I started out on an old Bundy in 7th grade, I actually tried a student model yamaha and didn't like it, but take into consideration that I was still pretty young and inexperienced then, that it could of just been me as a player. I played a vito until my junior year of high school which did me just fine other then a lot of loose springs but when I got my cannonball alto it suited me and is suiting me just fine up to this day. I am mainly a tenor player here at college and I have had several comments on the amazing dark tone that I get from my instrument. It responds well and I have never had any tuning problems. Someone had mentioned tuning issues in the higher register, but I actually found that when I was playing on a friends Yamaha at a concert while getting my loose spring fixed, that the yamaha was more out of whack in tuning in the higher registers then what my cannonball tenor had ever been. Going into a concert with a different instrument and brand of course I asked my friend what the tendencies of the instrument were and he told me that the above the staff C, D, E, and F etc. had a tendency to be sharp. I had to actually keep my right hand down to drop my above the staff D down a couple of cents so it wouldn't be so sharp, where is other cases I hadn't had that issue with my cannonball tenor. I guess it's all just a matter of opinion. I've played on Yamaha's and they respond great, but I am in love with my cannonballs. They produce great sound and I have had no problems with them. just watch out for those mouth pieces!!!!

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                  8. by MDM2011
                    (1 post)

                    4 years ago

                    Re: Cannonball Sax's

                    2009 Review from Jazzwise Magazine: RE: Cannonball Raven Alto Sax This handsome alto comes from Cannonball’s Big Bell Stone Series and the black lacquering really is the business. The Raven has a (solid feel and is a well built saxophone with very ergonomic keywork) – everything is pretty much where you’d want it. Uniquely it comes supplied with two crooks. One is a Fat Neck underslung very much in the Conn mould while the other is a more standard Selmerstyle affair. Our sample had a very positive and free key action – especially at the bottom end, with twin arms to the lower keys and standard leather pads. Sadly my big hands didn’t sit over the palm keys as I would have wanted, but the key positions would have undoubtedly been perfect for most people. Both the intonation and articulation were spot on. From the first note it was clear that the Raven is a saxophone that’s just asking to be played, it feels as though its Big Bell has been matched to a large bore. This instrument has a very centred and (a very wide range of sounds). You can play softly and it will produce a smooth, sensual sound – or you can blow the house down and it will respond with volume, depth and a case full of character. I preferred the Fat Neck crook, as it seemed to give me (an effortless top range). It also offered more power and less edge to the sound. Coming in the now standard plush-lined, preformed, zippered nylon denier case, the Raven gets my seal of approval and (is without doubt the most satisfying and sublime saxophone that has passed through this office in a very long time). These horns are made in the USA in Utah!

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