Saxophone Forum


by TheSoulfulOne
(2 posts)
10 years ago

Sax Query

Hi I'm new to this forum and i would like to learn more about the sax. I am contemplating getting a sax and undertaking lessons. My question is, if i have never played a musical instrument before, would it still be possible to become a good saxophonist? and if so what is the learning curve like? I am 22 btw. Many Thanks in advance!

Reply To Post [Report Abuse]

Report Abuse

Replies

  1. by golferguy675
    (600 posts)

    10 years ago

    Re: Sax Query

    It's always possible to become a good saxophonist. The curve...well, in my opinion, the sax is probably one of the easiest instruments to learn, but probably the hardest there is to master. Being 22, you need to make sure you're going to have time in your schedule for this, and be able to practice A LOT, especially because hof aving a private teacher. A good one will push you on practicing. If you don't have time for practice, chances are you'll get frustrated and quit. Good luck on what I would call a great journey, I hope the saxophone becomes a great part of your life. Rich

    Reply To Post


    1. by Sonny Rollins
      (2 posts)

      10 years ago

      Re: Sax Query

      As far a learning the saxophone, practice is the most important thing. At least 1 hour every other day. But you should shoot for an hour and a half everyday. Get the Unveral Saxophone method by Paul DeVille and work though it. Get a Rubank or other band type book and practice with a friend whenever possible. Lastly an instructor once a week is a necessity in order to focus on your weak aspects and to focus on the things that will make you progress the fastest. If you do this in one year you will be a proficient and music reading saxophonist.

      Reply To Post


    2. by sax_maniac
      (984 posts)

      10 years ago

      Re: Sax Query

      Ditto. Especially about getting a private instructor.

      Reply To Post


      1. by saxgrobie
        (86 posts)

        10 years ago

        Re: Sax Query

        I agree. Aside from the instructor, you can also get a good practice book with exorcises that build you up in many ways! ha ha, I owe alot to those little middle schooler books . . . :) Kelsey

        Reply To Post AIM


        1. by TheSoulfulOne
          (2 posts)

          10 years ago

          Re: Sax Query

          Any recommendations on useful text?

          Reply To Post


        2. by sax_maniac
          (984 posts)

          10 years ago

          Re: Sax Query

          Without any hesitation, get the Rubank Method books - otherwise known as the "Blue Books". Elementary is the first, then there are intermediate and Advnaced I & II books. They cost about $6, and are tried and true. They come with a fingering chart, but not much information related to technique until you get into learning trills and such. While technique is best learned from a good instructor, Larry Teal's "Art of Playing Saxophone" is a must-have for every saxophone player - no matter how skilled they might be. A diligent adult could spend some time with Teal's book and the Rubank books. You don't want to go too far, however, without some personal instruction or you could find yourself into really bad habits that will hold you back later on.

          Reply To Post


        3. by wianno
          (2 posts)

          10 years ago

          Re: Sax Query

          I second sax_maniac's suggestion about the Rubank books. If you go to saxlessons.com , you can hear each lesson played, so get a feel for meter, rhythm and intonation. JD

          Reply To Post


        4. by saxgrobie
          (86 posts)

          10 years ago

          Re: Sax Query

          Yes, the rubank books are the best. I used them when I took lessons. Kelsey

          Reply To Post AIM


        5. by golferguy675
          (600 posts)

          10 years ago

          Re: Sax Query

          If and when you get into jazz, a fantastic place to find books, is www.jazzbooks.com. Anything and everything you will ever need for jazz will most likely be there. If you're learning jazz, you really need to get into jazz at least a little bit. It's my favorite part of the sax, and if you do good enough, it will make you a living; if you've got a place for it, you may already have a great job.

          Reply To Post