Saxophone Forum


by jdaddy
(11 posts)
6 years ago

soloing through changes

i have have been practicing soloing through blues scales for a while now i am just getting into soloing through the chords and i was wondering how to learn when to use what scales on different chords. also if anybody has any good jazz songs to learn how to solo on without using blues sacles, thanks a lot.

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  1. by CountSpatula
    (602 posts)

    6 years ago

    Re: soloing through changes

    Find a teacher, easiest way.

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  2. by swingstreet
    (315 posts)

    6 years ago

    Re: soloing through changes

    With time and practice, and a good ear, you'll know what scales to use when you're soloing. Don't overthink what chords or scales you're going to use, otherwise you'll trip over your own feet, as it were. Just play, practice and listen, then it will come automatically.

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    1. by chalazon
      (547 posts)

      6 years ago

      Re: soloing through changes

      it's a life long study. Listen to the great players..listen, listen,listen, play with the aebersold books. Miles Davis said "there are no wrong notes"..play everything with right on rhythm..have fun...

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  3. by jaaaaackkiieee
    (4 posts)

    6 years ago

    Re: soloing through changes

    try heat's on by sammy nestico great piece to solo through changes on

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  4. by clamness
    (13 posts)

    6 years ago

    Re: soloing through changes

    pick a simple tune, then try writing out guide tone lines for yourself. to do that, get some manuscript. jot down the chord changes, then find the 3rds and 7ths of each chord (the most important notes) jot those down under the chords. then decide which of those two notes you are going to use to make as smooth (stepwise motion) a line from one chord to the next - you'll find you're going to go back and forth from 3rd to 7th a lot. then when you solo, try to hit those changing notes as the chords change. the notes in between (chord scales) are less important than hitting those chord changes. you could probably for now just play the notes of the key of the song in between to keep it simple. If you hit the changing notes, you are playing changes. voila! now you can skip your first year at north texas.

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    1. by Phineas
      (4 posts)

      6 years ago

      Re: soloing through changes

      Here are are my suggestions. 1. Learn and memorize melodies that are based on changes you wish to play over. If you need work on "I got rhythm changes", then learn and memorize as many tunes that use similar changes. 2. Sing/Hum/whistle what you would like to play, then learn it. I use to sit a round and listen to musicians that were not great soloist in their instrument, but could whistle or doodle some pretty interesting melodic lines. Most people who play jazz are listeners. When a cool groove/tune starts to play, people always have an idea of what they would like to hear over that groove. The trick is to take what you hear in your head, and learn to play it. There is a thin line between a great player, and a great player that people like to listen too. Sacrifice the theory for what you think sounds good. You can do this by playing what you would like to listen to!!!! It is my opinion that theory is made for playing tunes/songs you dont know. The tunes that you will play the best are the ones you memorized, and learn to solo over by ear/feel. These days, most sax players sound like a Charlie Parker excercise book. I say, be yourself, and experiment with your own thing. Be the next jazz legend. Peace on your journey my brotha! Phineas

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      1. by kneejerk52
        (397 posts)

        6 years ago

        Re: soloing through changes

        hi Phineas i am very interested in your explanation, if you are not a teacher i believe you should be. i agree with you on all points, but believe i need to learn theory to commiuncate better with other musicians. i can read fine but never learned the theory part and never have thought of what notes im playing except if they sound good or not. this limits me when i meet new players trying to learn tunes. i am currently planning lessons with a friend that's a teacher to work on this. peace to you also

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        1. by Phineas
          (4 posts)

          6 years ago

          Re: soloing through changes

          Notice I said that theory is only important when you do not know the song/tune. If you are in a situation where you are new to a group, or have to read a chart, then obviously you do not know the song/tune. Learning theory is abosolutely necessary! My point is this. Sure, I can read a chart, look at the changes, and play something. I can learn to choose the right scales/arps/licks that fit into those chord changes. For that matter, you can play a blues scale over almost any song! Will it be my BEST performance? No. I will just sound like a person playhing through changes. It may still sound good, but it will not be as good as if I just sat around experiementing with my approach to soloing on a particular tune. The idea is to FEEL while you are playing a solo, not THINK! It is not about how fast you play, or what you know, it is about what you play and how it sounds that counts. I have brought down the house not by playing fast or playing complicated, but just choosing the RIGHT thing to play. Everything else is icing on the cake. Unless you are playing in college, a big band or an orchestra. Phineas

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        2. by jdaddy
          (11 posts)

          6 years ago

          Re: soloing through changes

          Wow. Thank you so much for the lengthy replies. I am the type of person who really likes to solo and I can manage to solo over songs pretty well, but on more complicated charts, I tend to get lost in the changes. The 3rds and 7th outlines of the chords that you talked about seemed like a good way to approach it. I will try that. Thanks again, I really appriciate your time.

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        3. by jdaddy
          (11 posts)

          6 years ago

          Re: soloing through changes

          Wow. Thank you so much for the lengthy replies. I am the type of person who really likes to solo and I can manage to solo over songs pretty well, but on more complicated charts, I tend to get lost in the changes. The 3rds and 7th outlines of the chords that you talked about seemed like a good way to approach it. I will try that. Thanks again, I really appriciate your time.

          Reply To Post


        4. by jdaddy
          (11 posts)

          6 years ago

          Re: soloing through changes..

          Wow. Thank you so much for the lengthy replies. I am the type of person who really likes to solo and I can manage to solo over songs pretty well, but on more complicated charts, I tend to get lost in the changes. The 3rds and 7th outlines of the chords that you talked about seemed like a good way to approach it. I will try that. Thanks again, I really appriciate your time.

          Reply To Post


        5. by kelsey
          (793 posts)

          6 years ago

          Re: soloing through changes..

          jdaddy, you can say that again...........Kelsey
          Barry Kelsey

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        6. by jdaddy
          (11 posts)

          6 years ago

          Re: soloing through changes..

          haha sorry i didnt mean to send it 3 times

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        7. by clamness
          (13 posts)

          6 years ago

          Re: soloing through changes..

          no problem, i'm glad to help. i was there myself. just to make things clear, here are two 2-5-1 progression guide tone lines.... if we're thinking in the key of C, the 2-5 is D minor 7 to G 7 to C Major 7. so the top guide tone line would be c (the 7th of D min 7) to b (the 3rd of G7) and then stick on b (the 7th of C Major 7). the lower guide tone would be f (the 3rd of D minor 7) stick there on f for the 7th of G7, and then resolve down to E (the 3rd of C Major 7). so the first line is 7-3-7, the second is 3-7-3. you'll see that happens pretty much everywhere. notice that on a dominant 7 chord the 3rd and the 7th clash with eachother because they are a tritone apart. thats why a dominant 7 wants to resolve, to get rid of its clashiness. if you look at the notes that clash on G7 they are b and f, right? so what other chord has a b and f as 3rd and 7th? Db7, so you can substitute that chord for G7 if you wanted to (the sub 5 is what they call it). it's smoother to go Dmin7 Db7 C Major7 isn't it? when you get good at this voice leading/guide tone stuff (it's the same thing for piano voicings) you'll breeze through all the typical standards they play at jam sessions, etc. the next steps would be to work on chord scales and approach notes/patterns to chord tones. be cool.

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