Saxophone Forum


by saxjunkie89
(393 posts)
6 years ago

I'm not sure if any of you are experts on this, but...

Recently, my university acquired a (slightly used showcase model) silver-plated International Woodwind IW-661 bass saxophone. It is a beautiful instrument/player, and I'm very glad to be the sole player of it (YES!!!). The problem at hand, though, is something peculiar. Whenever trying to articulate middle E, F, F#, and G, the notes won't speak easily. I've tried fiddling with the reed/lig setup, making sure that the reed is sealing and such, only to some avail. I've experienced this problem on several other saxes prior to playing this bass, but never managed to work it out. Maybe it's just me, and maybe I'm not fully accustomed to the bass yet, but I'll give it a few more days of practice and a few suggestions from the regulars on here. Thanks for any help you may offer! -Lawrence

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  1. by saxxsymbol
    (217 posts)

    6 years ago

    Re: I'm not sure if any of you are experts on this, but...

    Check your body pip to see if it may be clogged or dirty. Make sure the neck pip is closing all the way when you press down the G and octave key. Try covering the neck pip with saran wrap or something to make sure the pad is not leaking.

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    1. by saxjunkie89
      (393 posts)

      6 years ago

      Re: I'm not sure if any of you are experts on this, but...

      Well, somehow I figured it out. I didn't necessarily do anything, but it worked itself out. Maybe I just needed to get used to the instrument first... Thanks for your advice, though! -Lawrence

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      1. by saxxsymbol
        (217 posts)

        6 years ago

        Re: I'm not sure if any of you are experts on this, but...

        I would bet that the reed placement might have been the problem. When the reed is misaligned it can affect some notes a lot more than others. Make sure your reed is even with the top of the mouthpiece tip when you close the reed down with your thumb. If it is too high your horn will sound darker and less responsive. ( this is done on purpose sometimes when your reed is too soft and you can't change it right away ). If it is too low some notes won't speak well or at all. Your tone can become thin and weak with the notes that do speak. I always check my reed first if I am having a problem and rule that out before checking anything else.

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