Saxophone Forum


by charlietuba
(2 posts)
4 years ago

1917 conn bari

I have a 1917 silver Conn bari in pretty good shape, VERY FEW body dents. Has been sprayed GOLD laquer. Is it worth the work to strip, polish, and repad? I am a tech. but do not want to do the work if there is no market. cl

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  1. by dgallego
    (27 posts)

    4 years ago

    Re: 1917 conn bari

    If you do not want it I will give it a home at David's Home for Wayward Saxophones. All kidding aside i would think that if it is a Low Pitch Conn and Plays well there will be a market. Some of us vintage horn guys will interested. I am not a bari player ( to big for me to handle now) but I still would make a nice addition. You have to figure what you are going to spend in time and money getting it right but I think you would find someone who would be interested. Example, in my collection is a 1880's Buesher True-Tone. It is silver with a pre automatic octave key system. ie 2 a upper range key and a lower range key. It takes some getting use to but it is not bad. On top of it it is a High Pitch horn. A not equal to 440. The guy who had it was going to make a lamp out of it since no one wanted to bid. I bought it for a fair price and put a full rebuild in it. It now plays sweet. The down side is that I have to really everything up to play with it and then it is somewhat still not dead on. But it has a great sound for early jazz. I have it because I enjoy old horns No other reason. Us crazies are out there.

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    1. by saxismyaxe
      (574 posts)

      4 years ago

      Re: 1917 conn bari

      From a financial standpoint, if any great degree of work needs to be invested to flip this model, it won't be worth the effort. This is the Conn baritone model with the octave key on the neck, and the pip on the body-a very flawed design that puts off many in this day and age. These simply don't fetch that much.

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