Saxophone Forum


by T(s)a(x)ng Dynasty
(8 posts)
5 months ago

Cannonball saxophones.

If I were to but a saxophone, would a cannonball tenor be a good buy? I have a 3500$ dollar bugdet. thanks

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  1. by RayH
    (2 posts)

    5 months ago

    Re: Cannonball saxophones.

    Hi

    This is Hakan Sax from Taiwan.  Our saxophones are made in Taiwan with unqiue body finishing (we apply the painting skill on automobiles and cellular phones on the surface of our saxophones) 

    Please check out our video:
    http://youtu.be/rMI90t3y5DY

    As commonly well known that P. Mauriaut and Cannonball are both made in Taiwan.  You may listen the sound yourself through the videos. 

    Price of tenor is USD 2300 including shipping.
    (Optional Color: Matte Black, Pearl White, Matte Gold, Clear Lacuqer)

    Please also visit our website:
    www.hakansax.com

    FB: https://www.facebook.com/HakanSaxShop

    Should you have any further quesiton please contact us

    Thank you very much!

    BR,
    Hakan Sax
    info@hakansax.com
     

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  2. by kelsey
    (784 posts)

    5 months ago

    Re: Cannonball saxophones.

    With your $3500.00 you could get a like new Yamaha YTS 62 (purple logo) tenor and a good Jody Jazz mouthpiece. (DV 7) Cannonballs can't touch the Yamahas for my money. Then you would have a good professional set up that would last a lifetime!!

    Barry Kelsey

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    1. by T(s)a(x)ng Dynasty
      (8 posts)

      5 months ago

      Re: Cannonball saxophones.

      how about a selmer horn?

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      1. by GFC
        (331 posts)

        5 months ago

        Re: Cannonball saxophones.

        If you're thinking about a Selmer Paris horn you might find a used Super Action 80 Series II or maybe a Mark VII for that price.  But there are a lot of other good models from different manufacturers that come up used in that price range or lower.  It depends on what you're looking for in a saxophone and how you want to buy, so it is worthwhile to think hard about what you really want.  Same goes for the YTS-62.  It's a good horn, but whether or not is for you is your personal decision that nobody can make for you.

        Cannonball makes good horns, but there are a lot of other good Asian horns in that price range or lower.  What is it that makes you interested specifically in Cannonball? 

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        1. by T(s)a(x)ng Dynasty
          (8 posts)

          5 months ago

          Re: Cannonball saxophones.

          The colors are nice, and makes it stand out. Plus they're not that expensive; I think around 2500 for tenor

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        2. by Saxquest
          (296 posts)

          5 months ago

          Re: Cannonball saxophones.

          In that $2500 price range, I would also consider P. Mauriat. You get a lot of horn for the money. What finish in particular were you attracted to?

          Cheers,
               Mark Overton
               www.saxquest.com

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        3. by T(s)a(x)ng Dynasty
          (8 posts)

          5 months ago

          Re: Cannonball saxophones.

          I like black finish, but something that isn't gold will do

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        4. by GFC
          (331 posts)

          5 months ago

          Re: Cannonball saxophones.

          I think the most important question at this stage is what kind of sound you want as a tenor player.  Modern?  Classic jazz?  Rock & Roll?  Swing era?  The sound concept you're after might influence your decision more than the finish would.

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        5. by T(s)a(x)ng Dynasty
          (8 posts)

          5 months ago

          Re: Cannonball saxophones.

          Currently im actually thinking about upgrading my mouthpiece, then my horn. what mouthpiece setup would you recomend for jazz? thanks! 

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        6. by GFC
          (331 posts)

          5 months ago

          Re: Cannonball saxophones.

          That sounds like a good plan.  What are you using now?  What do you like about it?  What do you wish was different?  My general recommendation for players wishing to develop their own jazz sound is to go with large-chambered pieces with small baffles and a medium-to-medium-large tip size.  The best known pieces in that category are the Otto Link pieces, but there are other good mouthpieces based on that same general design.   I play Links, but I hand-corrected some defects on them to improve their response.  Machine-finished pieces such as the Links are notorious for being inconsistent. The Van Doren V-16 gets good press.  Saxgourmet sells a piece called the Blues Blaster that I find intriguing because it is similar to a Link Super Tone Master and is a hand-finished piece that goes for about the same price as  the STM.  So either the V-16 or the Blues Blaster might have a critical quality edge over what Otto Link offers.  Other mouthpiece designs with smaller chambers and larger baffles are good for specific purposes - greater projection, volume, and brightness - but they mold your sound more.  

          One key advantage to doing the mouthpiece first is that you can budget for the mouthpiece that suits you best without being limited by what you just spent on a horn, and a mouthpiece ranks higher than the horn in terms of your sound.  Also, testing horns with the mouthpiece you want to use will eliminate the unpleasant surprises, such as intonation problems, that you might find if you change a mouthpiece for some reason after you've gotten the new horn.  

          There are several brands of good quality, moderately priced Asian horns that can be found in better music stores, including Cannonball, Antigua, RS Berkeley, and Paul Mauriat.  They all offer a variety of finishes.  You can find dealers on the websites for those brands.  Good luck and good hunting!

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        7. by T(s)a(x)ng Dynasty
          (8 posts)

          5 months ago

          Re: Cannonball saxophones.

          how would a soft reed and a more open mouthpieces play agianst a hard reed and a more closed mouthpiece

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        8. by GFC
          (331 posts)

          5 months ago

          Re: Cannonball saxophones.

          Mainly, a larger tip will allow you to generate more volume because it allows more travel at the tip of the reed.  With the same reed, a smaller tip allows better dynamic control at lower volumes.  Some players claim that a smaller tip  with a harder reed results in different overtones than does a larger tip with a softer reed.  I wouldn't know.  

          For any given model of mouthpiece in original factory condition, a smaller tip opening will result in a brighter sound with the same reed.  Similarly, reeds tend to make a darker sound as they get harder with the mouthpiece held constant.  The other variable is the flex profiles of different types of reeds.  Your Van Doren Javas have a somewhat bright, "jazzy" sound because they are designed to flex more near the tip relative to a Van Doren blue box reed of equivalent strength.  So a selection of reeds on hand is good to have when you are testing mouthpieces.

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      2. by kelsey
        (784 posts)

        5 months ago

        Re: Cannonball saxophones.

        The last great Selmer saxophone was the Mark Vl. Since then they haen't been able to even compete with themselves....

        Barry Kelsey

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      3. by saxgourmet
        (98 posts)

        5 months ago

        Re: Cannonball saxophones.

        you're kidding.......their sales of the subsequent models were (and are) FAR greater.......obviously, they know something.......there are plenty of MK VI horns floating around, yet new models sell in substantially greater numbers
         

        STEVE GOODSON
        New Orleans
        www.nationofmusic.com

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      4. by kelsey
        (784 posts)

        5 months ago

        Re: Cannonball saxophones.

        Selmer built their name with the Mark Vl. Since then they've been selling saxophones that aren't as good as the Mark Vl. That repretation of Selmer (built by the Mark Vl) still sells their overpriced products! Personally I think the best horns built today are the Yamaha's.

        Barry Kelsey

        Reply To Post AIM