Saxophone Forum


by lake4wa
(13 posts)
10 years ago

Conn 10M tenor, 1949

Wow, there sure are a lot of you extremely knowledgable Conn lovers out there. I just bought an original finish conn 10M tenor sax #334762. The lacquer is about 97% intact. There are no major dents, only a few small ones. It looks to be in really pretty good shape. Seller said pads look pretty good, but it will probably need a couple to put in top playing condition. Actually, it is being sent to me, I bought it on Ebay. What would a reasonable value be? I need to know if I got a good deal. I paid about $1200 for it. Did I make a good choice? I bought it for my son for Christmas. He's in high school jazz band, and his Yamaha just wasn't doing it for him anymore. Whaddaya think guys? Thanks, from a mom

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  1. by lake4wa
    (13 posts)

    10 years ago

    Re: Conn 10M tenor, 1949

    It does not have rolled tone holes, but some of you seem to think this makes for a brighter sound??

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  2. by connsaxman_jim
    (2336 posts)

    10 years ago

    Re: Conn 10M tenor, 1949

    The sax I gig with; really the only tenor I play to amount to anything, is a 1948 Conn 10M. I love it! It's the best sounding saxophone ever made in my opinion. 1949 is a good vintage. It's a very well made horn; very solid feel. The most sought-after 10M's are those made before 1948 with the rolled tone holes, but I actually like the horns made from about 1948-1956 better. Even some of the 10M's made in the 1960's before the MacMillan buy out were not too bad. While a pre-1948 10M in the same condition will bring $2500 or more easily, the 1948-1956 horns usually sell for $1500-$2000 depending on condition, so I'd say you got a very good buy at $1200. Even the 10M's from the 60's sell for $1200-$1500 if in good shape.

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    1. by connsaxman_jim
      (2336 posts)

      10 years ago

      Re: Conn 10M tenor, 1949

      There are advantages and disadvantages to rolled tone holes. The 10M's with the rolled tone holes have a warmer "lustier" tone to them, while the non-rolled tone hole models are a little brighter and "brassier" sounding. The rolled tone holes can be a pain to set up. I've done a couple of them and they went together easily. Maybe I got lucky, but the last 2 have been really giving me fits! I have a 1922 C Melody with rolled tone holes that I'm having a very hard time with. Some of the notes sound really "stuffy" and on the lower notes it bellows like a cow! I'm sure that the reason for this is set-up. I think the non-rolled tone holes are easier to set up.

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      1. by lake4wa
        (13 posts)

        10 years ago

        Re: Conn 10M tenor, 1949

        Hey Connsaxman, thanks for the reply. I actually based alot of my selling decision on prior posts by you. I received lots of good info from reading some of the Conn threads, and I appreciate your willingness to share your knowledge. Thank you!! BTW, I feel like an idiot, but what do you mean by "set up"?

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        1. by lake4wa
          (13 posts)

          10 years ago

          Re: Conn 10M tenor, 1949

          make that-my BUYING decision (-;

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        2. by connsaxman_jim
          (2336 posts)

          10 years ago

          Re: Conn 10M tenor, 1949

          By set up, I mean a combination of things such as the type of mouthpiece and reed thats used, the type of pads, and the adjustment of the action; key height, etc.

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        3. by connsaxman_jim
          (2336 posts)

          10 years ago

          Re: Conn 10M tenor, 1949

          Mainly with the c Melody I was referring to the type of pads ( I put resonator pads on it. The original pads were a smooth non-resonator white leather pad), the key height and the adjustment of the horn. a couple pads are not seating well and I think that's the reason for the problem. It seems to be much more critical with the rolled tone hole horns that all the pads are set at the exact same height. The non-rolled tone holes are a lot more forgiving.

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      2. by saxismyaxe
        (574 posts)

        10 years ago

        Re: Conn 10M tenor, 1949

        I agree about the 1948 and later horns Jim. I have actually found (and is this going to disturb the purist collectors out there) that the later horns often have better intonation than the earlier, rolled tone hole horns. And at $500.00 to $1,000.00 or more cheaper, I'll take them anyday! Mike S.

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        1. by lake4wa
          (13 posts)

          10 years ago

          Re: Conn 10M tenor, 1949

          thanks guys. Will let ;you know how the horn sounds after we receive it

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