Saxophone Forum


by Jordan1234
(2 posts)
9 years ago

A Great Blues solo?

I have heard great music by many substantial artists but i know that many of them used the great skill of improvisation. My question is that did any of them leave that talent on paper so a classically taught sax player like myself can branch out to new styles of music without having to spend a great deal of his time learning to improvise which is a skill which takes years to progress through and is a different sound each day. Does anyone hae this music on paper please?

Reply To Post [Report Abuse]

Report Abuse

Replies

  1. by eman19
    (131 posts)

    9 years ago

    Re: A Great Blues solo?

    there are books out there that have solos outlined for you. The best way to get into new styles are to simply get the album and play along. Check out Don Byas playing Harvard Blues with Count Basie, circa 1941. Its a good piece to try to write down. When you transcribe by ear, you teach your self what sounds good. and when you write down chord progessions (that you hear) and the notes, you can see how a great solo goes together. Hopes that helps

    Reply To Post


  2. by TANGO SIX ONE
    (255 posts)

    9 years ago

    Re: A Great Blues solo?

    Clasically trained well your right to recognise the differences and dificulties in moving one to another.The knights templar have guided many over the years into jazz.We state it is more difficult for a well trained classical player to approach jazz.That is a generalisation.Its actually easier th other way round.However the knights admire the classical way and respect it.The way you wish to start looking towards improvisation is the usual way the classical musician feels most comfortable, and may be right for what you want to do.It will never feel or be as nateral as you would like.There are no short cuts to becoming a good improviser.Just like the field you are in at the moment, start by doing a lot of listening to the best players and seek out a good jazz pro to give you a few pointers.Your background for discipline should stand you in good stead.The trick is to hear it and emulate the best.The difficult bit for you may be articulation.So with a classical up bringing you need to hook up with a jazz pro for occasional lessons, if you dig the music with your other skills it wont take you too long.But our advice would be stay away from written material.All the best with your new challenge.(Bird Lives)

    Reply To Post


  3. by connsaxman_jim
    (2336 posts)

    9 years ago

    Re: A Great Blues solo?

    Hi Jordan, There are a few fake books available that might help you. Check with your local music store. I know Herter Music here in Flint, MI has a good selection. They have a website; www.hertermusic.com. Improvisation is not the easiest skill to learn. The secret to learning improv is knowing the scales. In my opinion, improv is what seperates a great saxophonist and a good saxophonist. Blues music especially carries a certain emotion that must be improvised, and cannot effectively be written on paper. I think the best way to practice your improvisation is to practice playing along with a CD. Try to get a feel for the song, and not only the melody, but with Blues, also the emotions that the artist is trying to express. Good Luck, Jim

    Reply To Post Yahoo!


    1. by definition
      (963 posts)

      9 years ago

      Re: A Great Blues solo?

      Hey there, Im goin along with what Jim said, theres a few books that I put my students on usually. The first is the Charlie Parker Omni book, aka your new bible. Aside from being a good source of licks, it can teach you how all the scales and what not are applied. Next are the Jamey abbersold's "Blues in all Keys", volume 42 or 43 in his series I believe. Lastly I suggest getting Around the Horn bu Walt Weiskoph, which is gonna kick your but all over the page and around the horn. Those will help get a solid foundation into the style, but to really learn and apply it, listen to the artists, and not just sax players, listen to everyone to learn from cause they can all teach you. Listen to how they use what you are learning. Lastly, nothing can replace a good teacher in this process

      Reply To Post Yahoo! AIM


      1. by sax_maniac
        (984 posts)

        9 years ago

        Re: A Great Blues solo?

        Hal Leonard Jazz Play Along Series - you can get a number of them through Amazon for around $10. Others for $15. As a budding improvisationalist (classically trained), it's a journey for the fingers and the ego to get the hang of it. I'm not at the point where I can rip through a solo when sight reading a complex chord progression, but I feel no shame in scripting out a solo based on what I want to hear myself play. Especially when I get a few compliments at the end of the set. Happily a hack!

        Reply To Post


    2. by TANGO SIX ONE
      (255 posts)

      9 years ago

      Re: A Great Blues solo?

      The knights Templar have read these responses.Ok these peole are all reccomending this book and that book etc.Thats fine thats how they see it.you have to make a choice which way to go.Believe us when we say nearly every one goes down the road they suggest, in the short term is easy option but medium to long term, its going nowhere.There is no angle to this thats how most see it, but believe us it wont make you a good player.We suggest meeting any top blues and or top jazz musician and they will confirm this.They themselves may have written many books for the market place but they didnt do it that way.We sincerely wish you all the best which ever way you choose but over the years the knights have seen hundreds of students making this mistake.In the medium to long term it limits your improvisation. it will never be nateralYou are an ideal candidate to do really well. Its about how you hear and see the music in your head,thats key.Just like to us a g flat and an f sharp are totally different sounds in your head even when you just pitch one of them.We feel passionate about this because nearly everyone makes the mistake unless guided correctly.These responces are all good stuff, and they all mean well,they dont no any different but to us its not the quickest and most proficient way.Example when you learn to play a good blues solo you should have no concept of a blues scale in your mind,that is the limited way to learn.In all honesty our way of learning in medium term speeds the process up by decades.At the same time you play truth. Well which ever way you go good luck, i hope we at least make you check it out first.(Bird Lives)

      Reply To Post


      1. by sax_maniac
        (984 posts)

        9 years ago

        Re: A Great Blues solo?

        notonlyareyourresponseshardtoreadbuttheyrambleonwithoutaddingmuchbenefittothereadertosimplytellsomeonetoplaywhattheyhearintheirheadisachallengetosomeaskilltoothersandatalenttoafewithinkthatbooksareagreatwayforapersontodevelopthatinnerearandthentheycanovertimedeveloptheskilltodoitontheflythensomedaytheycanbecomequitetalentedatithowouldapersonwhohasneverlistenedtomusicplayaninstrumenthowwouldapersonwhohasneverappliedthemselveswithsomeformofstructureplayaninstrumentunlessyouthinktheonlytrueformofmusicisfreejazzthereisnothingwrongfromlearningfromotherswhetheritistranscribingsolosordoingscalesalongwithplayalongsorwhateverandfortherecordwhatmostpeoplecallfreejazzisn'tallthatfreemostofitcanbebrokendownsystematicallyexceptforthepioneeringprojectsofpeoplelikejohnzornandsomeothertrueexperimentalistsiamofthecampthatstructureandevensciencecanprovideacertainleveloftangibilitytomusicwhichismoreimportanttothelivelihoodofmusicthanleavingittoafewelitistsornaturalprodigies

        Reply To Post


    3. by jamterry
      (573 posts)

      9 years ago

      Re: A Great Blues solo?

      you don't need a book. get a piano or guitar player to comp for you. you need to play over a 12 bar blues progression, just stumble over your horn until you finf the notes that fit the chords. tell your accompanist to change keys, and start over in the new key. this may seem like a fly by the seat of the pants method and it is. i learned to play blues as a child, and went on to learn diatonic modes later. any scale or mode that you learn is a foundation for you to build upon. you will spend a lot of time on this venture, if you want to get good. i'll give you something to mess with. start with your hi D(palm key). play D, C, A, A FLAT, G, F, D. go down that scale and come back up. you will get a feel for the blues. then you can pick up other keys by ear. later the technique and licks will come. listen to blues records and learn the licks that you like. you will do just fine :)

      Reply To Post Yahoo! AIM ICQ