Saxophone Forum


by calongshire
(11 posts)
9 years ago

Buescher Players...How many on board?

Just wanting to get a feel of how many on the forum play or have played on Bueschers. I have grown quite fond of the old horns. I currently have three; a 1939 Aritocrat tenor, 1925? True Tone gold plated alto and a 1936 Aristocrat alto. The tenor is payed daily and the two altos are soon-to-be sent for a complete overhaul...no relacquering though...just a good cleaning and repad.

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  1. by achristocrat
    (3 posts)

    8 years ago

    Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

    ive been playing the same buescher aristocrat (282... serial number range) for 10 years and love it. its had three change of pads since. currently i am using roopads which work wonderfully.

    Reply To Post


  2. by bobstad6
    (28 posts)

    8 years ago

    Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

    I just noticed this forum while looking for someplace to find information about an "Elkhart by Buescher" alto I just saw for sale in a local music store, for $325.(when were they made, etcetera?) The neck is slightly ovalised from having once been bent, and I'm wondering if this can be corrected and/or even if an aftermarket reinforcement can be added? (so many older altos that would otherwise be fine horns seem to've been damaged thusly, and I would think someone would've gotten into reinforcing them when in a repair shop...though I've never seen this done...you'd think the neck would be liable to further bending more so than usual, after being once damaged-even if repaired well enough to make the tube round again.

    I've had six Bueschers; currently an alto made in 1929 that I'm getting ready to try to overhaul myself using the Dutch TopTone rubber pads that I've never seen before, but that were recommended from a link at Bert Wilson's website and sell for a hundred dollars a set, including glue and instructions (wwwDOTbertwilsonDOTcom). This is a horn I bought in '97 for $400 in Berkeley and which has played well, but the pads are getting pretty funky and now a few springs have broken until even pony tail hair ties and nylon thread won't keep it playing.

    I bought a Yamaha YAS-23 I enjoy alot for $450 in 2003, which except for its stiffer action is amazingly remniscent by its feel in my hands of a top of the line '67 Buffet alto I had for six months in high school but couldn't keep up the payments on-I was learning things on the Yamaha I would then teach myself to do on the old Buescher...I've also had a pristine early Mark VI alto #83038; and a very nice Super 20 alto with a silver neck. I have also had five other Bueschers, begining with a soprano and sopranino that were a relative's. Howard Ward of Covert Music in Fort Worth restored the sopranino for $39.95 that I'd hitch hiked from the Seattle area to bring to him in '71 or '72. He recommended against a job as an instrument repairman, citing his emphasima from buffing innumerable trombone bells, etcetera...I'd attended North Texas State University the '70-'71 school year, attracted by the jazz reputation and the amazingly low tuition-less as an out of state student than I'd of paid as a resident in Washington state-though in Texas there was the possibility of getting a life prison sentence for a first criminal offense if you got caught in possession of even a single "joint" cigarette of marijuana and which actually happened to a black man there around that time who is still serving his sentence-not a student or anyone I knew though he has become a little famous even...I doubt if many out of state musicians at NTSU even knew of this potentiality; and/or everyone acted as if they didn't.

    Harvey Pittel played my Buescher sopranino not long after the Selmer company had made a sopranino especially for him, the first sopranino made in the world in 40 years at that time (circa '73) and he said my horn played better than all of the sopraninos made by Selmer his students had bought after his, and as well as his own horn.

    I never mastered making my own reeds for it and had so-so luck playing the instrument myself, and unfortunately ended up selling it to the alto player in THE OWENS BROTHERS BAND at the Sheraton Inn in Spokane, a black guy just out of a military band, for $100 the winter of '78 or '79 when I was hitch hiking through town from the other side of the state and there was a foot of ice and snow on the ground and I needed the money to spend a night in a skid row hotel...before I discovered rescue missions. I'd seemed to alienate my pater by my radical political outlook and he'd forced me to take the sopranino with me from the family home along with all of the rest of my possessions; literally carrying everything I owned on my back, or as in the case of the sopranino, in my hand in a case of black walnut my grandfather had made for it...I used to tell people my grandparents had been great fans of Charlie Parker's most famous sideman; Mitch Miller...who liked to sing along following the bouncing ball-how arcane and archiac even! It was exceptionally beautiful with a light colored laquer and looked like a brand new horn and Pittel's jaw visibley dropped when I pulled it out to show it to him while I'd been taping him for KAOS-FM radio at Evergreen College in Olympia. There were only two left hand palm keys and two right hand side keys. The soprano was one with the brand name HARWOOD, and I was told it was actually a Buescher and that many horns from this era ended up with the name of the music store they were sold at on the bell, instead of the manufacturer's. My relative had played both instruments in 1917 I was told, and they'd been in a trunk in a basement in Aberdeen, WA with all the pads rotted away and also with the metal covered with corrosion when I got them. I stupidly let a trumpet playing associate from high school talk me into selling it to Larry Fowlkes while he was studying with Gary Peacock at the Cornish School in Seattle, a great tenor player just out of an army band in the Phillipines. Fowlkes had the instrument totally rebuilt, that was a silver horn with gold plating. I heard him play his graduation recital, so the experience wasn't a total loss and he said he'd give it back to me some day, but the last time I spoke with this trumpet guy he told me Fowlkes had been dead for quite some time...myself and the trumpeter are not on good terms and haven't been for decades. Who I'd kept in touch with while at NTSU when he was in the midst of becoming "an officer and a gentleman" etcetera, at Fort Belvior and later at West Point, in the army...who went to Cornish on the G. I. bill after an injury to his knee while wrestling at West Point in the middle of his second year there, just after Cornish had gotten federal funding to start their new jazz program and got Peacock, Denny Goodhew, Jay Clayton, Julian Priester and others to be faculty members.

    As I was leaving Evergreen and Olympia, I ended up trading a '70 Selmer Mark VI tenor for Manny Pinson's Buescher Aristocrat tenor, and $400. It took me years to collect the cash, which I felt badly about since I much prefered the Buescher to the Selmer, as I think did Pinson...the original tenor player with the Oly band OBRADOR, wwwDOTobradorDOTorg. I eventually ended up sharing a residence in Dallas (also circa '79) with a rock guitarist who doubled as a horn repairman, and gave him that Aristocrat in lieu of my last month's rent-which I don't think ever got to our landlord. My debt had amounted to only $75, so sort of a burn...I'd had undiagnosed spinal deformities from congenital/idopathic and juvenile spinal diseases I only became fully informed about nine years ago, and thinking myself able bodied and with the rest of the world definitely expecting me to be I'd made some rather ambitious career and employment choices, etc. After riding a ten-speed from Dallas to Bonners Ferry May of '79 for a gathering of a communal yoga study group calling itself ANTAHKARANA CIRCLE OF HEALERS, I'd ended up in Ojai, CA in the '80s thanks to someone I'd met on my bicycle ride. That is in Ventura county just west of "Smell-A" and where I got to know Betty Sterite-Manuel de Jesus, who plays alto and flute and is the lead singer and percussionist in her husband Jose's band NATIVE SUN there. They were opening for Freddie Hubbard's band at the Ventura Fairgrounds the last I heard, and had gotten THE DOOBIE BROTHERS keyboardist the day before their gig to be their new tenor player after Joe Orswell had very suddenly quit the day before with no warning. She had gotten me another Buescher Aristocrat tenor identical to the one Manny had sold me, if not a little nicer even, and in an old brown zipper Mark VI Selmer case. I still can't remember exactly what happened to that horn, but it was a very very nice saxophone...I think I may've just sold it back to Betty. I can usually remember just about anything, so this is a little odd...I'll keep trying...I don't think she was too happy getting the horn back, and I was probabley really broke at the time.

    My next Buescher was also a tenor, and to date probabley my most favorite saxophone of eighteen-including, a $34 brand new very interesting curved soprano recently purchased from [trmusicalsDOTcom] in India, plus shipping and handling; and one I made myself out of old Bundy resonite Eb clarinet parts a hand's breadth long in the key of E that plays chromatically, overblowing the octave and with nine tone holes. I bought it for $225 from an ad in the FLEA MARKET WANT AD paper in Berkeley in the mid '90s, from a doctor there living on Talbot who'd been a clarinetist in high school and was saving his clarinet he played more often, but had decided to finally sell the tenor. This was a Buescher Windsor, a student model horn made in the '50s, that got trashed by a group of ruffians I'd been drinking rum with across the street from the Redway liquor store, in the brush...after Judi Bari, RAD DOG and ZERO had appeared at the Eureka Municiple Auditorium not long after I'd broken down and got stranded here April of '96 traveling in a '75 Chevy van I'd gotten in Spokane for $600 in '94 I'd been fixing up to live out of, coming up from Berkeley to Olympia and elsewhere in Washington state-where I'm from originally. I'd done a Charles Gayle remniscent jam on the sidewalk there in Redway earlier-who I'd heard at the James Moore Theater in Oakland, commenting he couldn't imagine why anyone would pay money to hear what he did-and probabley hadn't made a great following for my music locally.

    That Windsor is/was the epitomy of what everything designed by man or nature should be, in my opinion...built so strong a person probabley could've pounded nails with it-well almost at least, and very simple in design and execution yet with an incredibley light and fast action, great effortless response and a wonderfully fine intonation, sound and timbre', etcetera and that never went out of adjustment, and until the end while I had it had never needed any sort of work even though I carried it in a cheap brown vinyl gig bag, inside of a small green nylon backpack with a leather bottom from REI that opens at the top...every saxophonist should know about those packs!(that damned doctor even told me what strength of reed to play, insisting on 2 1/2s like he was the pope or something-though I found I favored threes...I never got a chance to get a mouthpiece other than what had come with it, the stock one the horn was sold with I think...though it played fairly well anyway...I'd played a 10* metal Otto Link when I was learning tenor, with the '70 Mark VI, that Chuck Stentz had modified especially for me...he called it a ten star, but I don't know if Link even made them with that wide a tip opening. Chuck is a great jazz tenor player who I took lessons from a little; though not much of a practicer much of the time I was with him...too many other things to do while in college...no one should ever go through life without the experience of playing a great tenor sax with a mouthpiece like that, but undoubtabley many people do...another reason I tend to believe human social evolution is a very very very slow and painstaking process! and why I continue to be a Marxist, etc.

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    1. by KingNecron
      (76 posts)

      8 years ago

      Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

      I wish my life was that Kerouac-esque. Also, I'm interested in the Buescher, so uh... yeah. That's my excuse for posting here.

      Reply To Post AIM


    2. by eremite
      (2 posts)

      9 months ago

      Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

      Wow, your story reminds me of an Abe Simpson tale(not that there's anything wrong with that). Here's my Buescher story: In 1973 I was living on E. 5th street on the lower east side of Manhattan, a few doors down from the 9th Precinct, the exterior of which was featured at the beginning of every N.Y.P.D Blue episode.

      One day as I was bicycling from Chinatown up the Bowery to my job in the men's shelter, a co-worker drove past and shouted "Hey Richie, your apartment is on fire!" I paid him no mind as he was a jerk...until I got to my block and saw the fire engines hosing down all my precious possesions.

      Fortunately my friend the vibes player Duncan Gavin Lawson (wonder what became of him), who lived nearby, took me in. While staying at his place he let me play his  silver alto sax and seeing that I was really into it, he sold it to me for $75. He said it was WWII vintage.

      Two years later I left the states and left the horn in my parent's garage, where it sat for the next 35 years. I was reunited with it recently and it's now getting an overhaul by the Seattle tech Scott Granlund. So far, so boring but now comes an interesting conjecture.

      It turns out my Big B Buescher alto was made around 1941 for some branch of the armed forces. It has U.S. stenciled large below the B. In the case, which was original, were some reeds in a plastic bag which had Japanese advertising on it. In 1946 John Coltrane was in a navy band, stationed in Hawaii, playing alto. He would have been playing a government issue horn. Now I don't know if any other makers supplied instruments to the Army, Navy, etc. but I like to imagine that my horn could very well have been the one Coltrane played. One can dream.

      I also like to imagine that on May 15 1953, when I was two and a half years old, a strange man came shambling down my street, sat down on the front stoop of my house, and imparted priceless wisdom to me with boozy breath. You see, we lived not far from La Guardia airport, where Charlie Parker missed his flight to Toronto and disappeared for several hours. Unfortunately, I think I would have remembered an eccentric black man passing the time with me; I'd never met one before. But there's still the possibility that the horn he pawned prior to the Massey Hall concert was my very same Big B.

      One can dream....

       

       

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  3. by bobstad6
    (28 posts)

    8 years ago

    Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

    Opps, an error in my recent post here. That should've been "Howard Ward, of Colvert Music in Fort Worth," not "Covert Music."(my Fruedian slip must've been showing?)

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  4. by definition
    (963 posts)

    9 years ago

    Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

    '49 top hat and cane tenor, silver

    Reply To Post Yahoo! AIM


    1. by Dave Dix
      (421 posts)

      9 years ago

      Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

      1927 True Tone alto ,28 T/T tenor ,29 T/T bari, 39 aristo tenor and 1953 aristo tenor.Buescher made some of the best horns available Dave

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      1. by saxjunkie89
        (393 posts)

        9 years ago

        Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

        I started playing bari on a 1950's Aristocrat

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        1. by Mactenor
          (102 posts)

          9 years ago

          Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

          1949 Buescher TH&C original laquer at about 95%. Has a big, smooth sound. Best Regards Mactenor

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        2. by johnsonfromwisconsin
          (767 posts)

          9 years ago

          Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

          I would just like to take this opportunity to express my utter jealousy at the Silver TH&C and 39 Crat tenors and the Gold TT I have a late 400 Tenor and TT Bari. good horns.

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      2. by calongshire
        (11 posts)

        9 years ago

        Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

        Top Hat & Cane...YES! I hope to get one someday. I have looked at a few in the past, usually they are banged-up pretty bad or have had extensive buffing done. They are all nice horns and when I get my two altos back, I may retire my modern horn.

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        1. by kneejerk52
          (397 posts)

          9 years ago

          Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

          i have a early 1920's tru tone stencil, silver with gold wash. i did a repad and had a pro set up. it plays better than i could have dreamed.

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      3. by zero_possibilities
        (6 posts)

        8 years ago

        Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

        i have just purchased a 1919 buescher ELK HART Tenor i believe it is low pitched, is there any way to get this instrument in picth? and whatever else anyone could tell me about this horn would be greatly appreciated.

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        1. by Sax Mom
          (964 posts)

          8 years ago

          Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

          Low pitch is today's standard, so that shouldn't be a problem.

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      4. by doughaning
        (1 post)

        8 years ago

        Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

        I have a Wurlitzer C-soprano made by Buescher. I would guess mid 1920's. Keyed to high Eb, the upper stack is drawn and everything else is straight chimneys. So far I have only tried a Rico Graftonite, yielding a range of timbres from close to a violin to a very good baroque trumpet. This is also the loudest saxophone I have ever played.

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      5. by JazzFox
        (3 posts)

        6 years ago

        Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

        Just a week back I picked up a 1925-26 Buescher straight Soprano and I love it. I also play on a 1962-ish Buescher 400 Bari and I will say, these two horns are great. Lots of volume when you need it and beautiful tone. My main horn is a 1947 Conn 10m tenor (non-rolled tone holes) that goes everywhere with me and has the greatest soul of all of my horns. Then there is my 1979 Selmer Mark VII Alto that with the otto link I found for it produces a nice mello, I have been told produces a tone close to that of Johnny Hodges. Overall, I really do like my Buescher horns, I was really impressed with the Bari and now, with the soprano, I am even more impressed. I still love my Conn tenor, but I wouldn't mind getting my paws on a nice TH&C Buescher one of these days.

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        1. by knighttrain
          (31 posts)

          6 years ago

          Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

          Welcome to the Buescher fan club. Glad you like your Bueschers. I have a 70's vintage 400 Bari, a late 70's Alto, an early 70's Bundy Tenor, and a late 20s Alto "True Tone". I love all of them. Easy players - great intonation. I have other supposedly better horns, but my 70's Buechers almost always are the ones I pack for gigs. Like you say - hard to beat the sound. (BTW - I also have a '47 6M - I envy you your 10M).

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          1. by JazzFox
            (3 posts)

            6 years ago

            Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

            Very nice Knighttrain. Does that '47 6M of yours have rolled tone holes?

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            1. by knighttrain
              (31 posts)

              6 years ago

              Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

              No it doesn't - it was made just after Conn quit doing those. I do have a gold-plate C-mel Conn with RTH, and a couple of Kohlerts with them - I don't believe it really chnges the sound or the playability - just cooler I suppose. I really like the action on my 6M. The keywork is amazingly fast and solid. - Doesn't take a back seat to anything I've played, vintage or modern.

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            2. by JazzFox
              (3 posts)

              6 years ago

              Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

              I agree, the keywork is amazingly well done and is very smooth and fast under the fingers. I really like the feel of my '47 10M and really, I think with how close I am to the end of the RTH, my horn's lack of them means nothing. It wails like nothing else and has a beautiful tone.

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          2. by maddenma
            (1 post)

            5 years ago

            Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

            Been a couple years since someone replied to this post, but since I just joined, I'll add mine to the list. Big B Tenor, serial number 326xxx. My father got this horn new and passed it on to me in the early 70's. I had it chemically stripped (laquer went south) and gold plated in 73. Played it for 15 years through a music degree and into my early 30's when I changed careers, sold my Yamaha Alto and put the Tenor into storage because a pawn shop wouldn't offer me anything for it. Lucky break! Just got it back out after a couple decades. Curiously, everything worked well. Forgot what a wonderful sounding horn it was. Back in the 70's my teachers all told me to get a real horn (Selmer), but I hung on to it relentlessly despite not playing because of sentimental value. Now that I am again, I'm very happy to still have it. Looking for a matching Alto if anyone knows of one available.

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            1. by Mouldingman
              (4 posts)

              5 years ago

              Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

              I have an Alto True Tone 212xxx ~1913 still want an Alto? Silver with Gold wash.

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              1. by LHB
                (2 posts)

                4 years ago

                Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

                Just joined the site - have a Beuscher Elkhart True Tone soprano (low pitch) 222xxx. Bought it in '92 in Concord NH for $400. High D key button is busted off and octave key currently sticks. Need to take it in to replace pads (when last replaced they used pads that replicated original buttons.) Started playing it in '92 but then put it down. Now have an 11 yr old playing alto so I decided it was time to get off my keyster and play the damn thing. Beautiful tone. Recommendations for reeds?

                Reply To Post


            2. by mzaffino
              (2 posts)

              8 months ago

              Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

              Hi, wow I thought I was the only guy foolish enough to play a beet up old saxiphone. I started out 20 years or so ago with a beat up Beusher true tune tenor that I got at a pawn shop it needed some fixing and that is where I started to learn about saxophone repair. It was  a good solid horn but ergonomicly couldn't compete with the series 80 II selmer I ended up with. Fast forward 18 years I decided I wanted to try bari sax and history repeaded it's self. I bought a Beuscher "The Elkhart" Bari 1927 roughly. repaded it and played for a couple of years beutifull dark sound to match it's dark lacquer petina. Well I decided I really like playing baritone and got my self a yamaha YBS-62 wich I love. I'm looking to to sell the vintage bari. so if anyone is interested please let me know. I do agree these hore have some of the best timbre around.

              Reply To Post


            3. by glyphrunner
              (2 posts)

              6 months ago

              Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

              I have a 1925 Buescher True Tone (Low Pitch) #199xxx. It has its original "1" neck with a curiousity: the name "Jack McCasli" is engraved on the left side up near the cork. I acquired this horn from my father who bought it as a used instrument (read that: inexpensive) from a Pampa, Texas music shop in 1964. It's been in the family ever since. I still play my alto once or twice per week since my 11-year-old daughter is starting up jazz sax; although, I prefer my tenor girl far more than the alto.

              Reply To Post


            4. by oversaxed
              (4 posts)

              9 years ago

              Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

              I have 5 - S.A.T.B and C Melody. all pre-1940 Aristocrats except the C and Soprano - all are played regularly - with the C getting the least play. the Alto and Bari the most.

              Reply To Post


              1. by connsaxman_jim
                (2336 posts)

                9 years ago

                Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

                Aside from my Conns, I also play a 1949 Buescher 400 Top Hat & Cane tenor, and a 1953 Buescher 400 alto. Bueschers are great horns!

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                1. by DaveUK1965
                  (14 posts)

                  9 years ago

                  Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

                  1934 Aristocrat. Wonderful bluesy sax. I also have a 1922 Conn New Wonder, and the Buescher is almost a completely different instrument.

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                  1. by paulwl
                    (5 posts)

                    9 years ago

                    Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

                    I own over a dozen Bueschers, dating from 1925-'55. Along with Conns, they are my favorites and the backbone of a nearly 30-piece sax collection. My favorites: the New Aristocrat alto and tenor and the curved soprano (mine's an Aristocrat from 1936!).

                    Reply To Post


                  2. by blackfrancis
                    (396 posts)

                    9 years ago

                    Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

                    i started on a (post Selmer) Buescher. Good tone, a bit flat in the palm keys. Got me through Jr. High, High school and into my college years. When I win the lottery, I'm gonna get an older one!

                    Reply To Post


                  3. by discipleofsigurd
                    (2 posts)

                    9 years ago

                    Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

                    Buescher 1935 Aristocrat Alto Buescher 1925 Curved Soprano

                    Reply To Post


                  4. by Mactenor
                    (102 posts)

                    8 years ago

                    Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

                    I just purchased a 1942 Buescher Big B Aristocrat tenor, what an awesome horn. Vintage American Horns are unbelievable works of art, the quality of the metal and the pride of the craftsmen are a piece of Americana, that unfortunately, is irreplaceable. Best Regards Mactenor

                    Reply To Post


                  5. by saxismyaxe
                    (574 posts)

                    8 years ago

                    Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

                    I have some nice examples of the True Tone, Aristocrat and 400 TH & C and Big B models in my collection and am fond of them all. None are my current primary horns for the respective S/A/T/B/Bass slots in my lineup, but certainly could be.

                    Reply To Post


                  6. by mels
                    (13 posts)

                    8 years ago

                    Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

                    I have a 1922 Elkhart by Buescher and wouldn't trade it for anything. Gotta love eBay.

                    Reply To Post


                  7. by silentchimes
                    (2 posts)

                    8 years ago

                    Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

                    I'm a vocalist and keyboards, but found a Buescher Windsor 388942. 'had it repadded etc, . I don't know whether to donate it to the local Band or sell it. Any advice? It appears in very good shape. Thanks, Chris

                    Reply To Post


                  8. by musicwriter2001
                    (14 posts)

                    8 years ago

                    Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

                    hi, i am new here. i have a brass buescher 400 tenor from 1959 and a really old c mel that is waiting for a rebuild. i also have an old silver holton alto that really screams. the 400 is loud as hell with my selmer metal mouthpiece and thats the way i like it.

                    Reply To Post


                  9. by Sax Mom
                    (964 posts)

                    8 years ago

                    Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

                    Cool! Welcome to the board!

                    Reply To Post


                  10. by pachesma
                    (1 post)

                    8 years ago

                    Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

                    Another "FNG" five minutes ago. Buescher aristocrat sn 290291 ('39-'40??). My Father played prior to enlisting in the USA WWII, bands south shore of Boston and the honkey tonks of Nantasket beach, and then did the same for a couple years when he got home. I picked it up in the 3rd grade(early 60's), and I didn't put it down till the mid 70's(BIGGEST mistake of my life). Carl Swift, Quincy Ma(Red Nichols and his 5 pennies) was my teacher for many years. MAN, could he wail!!(RIP Carl) My Dad went to his "final reward" in 2004 and now I'm sitting here looking at it. And I've decided I'm gonna pick it up again. Question- whose a quality rebuilder/restorer hopefully in the greater Boston vicinity??-JRC

                    Reply To Post


                  11. by swingstreet
                    (315 posts)

                    8 years ago

                    Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

                    When I lived in Boston I used to take my horn to a guy named Bob Drinkwater at Carl Fischer on Boylston Street. He loves old horns and does a good job.

                    Reply To Post


                  12. by jazzears
                    (12 posts)

                    8 years ago

                    Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

                    I have two 50's-vintage Elkharts--an alto and a tenor. They aren't exactly pretty, but they sound good, play well, and are Buescher made horns. I would love to have a first-line horn, but I won't take one off the market until I am a good enough player to justify it.

                    Reply To Post


                  13. by wallsadm
                    (5 posts)

                    8 years ago

                    Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

                    you can another player to the list i have a 1926 true tone. got last year as a fathers day gift from my daughter plays rather well, i played thru elememetry, jr and senior high, plus several band camps

                    Reply To Post Yahoo!


                  14. by KingNecron
                    (76 posts)

                    8 years ago

                    Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

                    Yeah, I bought a Buescher Aristocrat alto sax from someone on SaxQuest back in August (2006). It's a student model from the 70s, but it's a great little horn, and perfect for a tenor player like me. I love jammin' on Herbie Hancock's "Watermelon Man" with it. I still need to name it, though...

                    Reply To Post AIM


                  15. by eman19
                    (131 posts)

                    8 years ago

                    Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

                    I play a Buescher True Tone from '28. Great Horn. My favorite though is my Martin Comm II alto. I'm still looking for a Martin Comm II tenor in good condition.

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                  16. by knighttrain
                    (31 posts)

                    8 years ago

                    Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

                    My current Bueschers include a '27 Tru-Tone Alto, a '78 Aristocrat 200, a '73 Buescher (Bundy) Tenor, and a '76 Buescher 400 Bari. I have other horns, but these are the ones I usually play when it counts.

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                  17. by mattpenn
                    (1 post)

                    8 years ago

                    Re: Buescher Players...How many on board?

                    Hello, My dad plays a newer (50"s) Buescher. I just got hold of a Buesher 410 trombone. Anyone know where I can get info on that old but neat creation?

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