Saxophone Forum


by CatLoaf
(2 posts)
1 week ago

unsure about conn shooting star tenor saxophone

I have had a this specific tenor saxophone for 6 years and I recently got curious and was looking into buying a new one because this one had been used when i had gotten it etc.

I saw multiplie post about people online talking about the specific brand and make and I wanted to know if there was any way to possibly know when/where it was made

I thought it might have been american/USA made but looking under the thumb rest and serial number, it is very hard to make out because the saxophone is very old and has lost a lot of its luster and shine. Anyways it looks like it says Mexico so I believe that gives me an answer (IDK)

The only other information i have it That the serial Number says (N) 38993
if I could have any advice or help on knowing how old etc this thing is that would be nice

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  1. by mijderf
    (146 posts)

    1 week ago

    Re: unsure about conn shooting star tenor saxophone

    The letter "N" means that it was made in 1970.  The "Mexico" means that it was manufactured in Nogales, Mexico.

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  2. by GFC
    (720 posts)

    1 week ago

    Re: unsure about conn shooting star tenor saxophone

    Recycle the sonofabeach and get something playable.

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    1. by CatLoaf
      (2 posts)

      7 days ago

      Re: unsure about conn shooting star tenor saxophone

      this saxophone has always been the easiest to stay/get into tune

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      1. by mijderf
        (146 posts)

        6 days ago

        Re: unsure about conn shooting star tenor saxophone

        If that is the case, why not keep it?  If you are looking for a different sound, that is more easily achieved with a change in reed and mouthpiece.  

        If you just want something nicer, I would recommend looking at sites like Saxquest and buying a good, used tenor.  When you buy new you get a nice shiny horn that will drop 1/2 its value in  a year or two.  Also, a surprise to many, new horns are not guaranteed to be set up properly.  Better to get a reliable, well built used tenor that has been properly set up.
        Most shops will also let you call them and discuss what you are looking for.  If possible, travel to the shop and spend some quality time playing before you buy. 

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