Saxophone Forum


by hultingcohen@gmail.com
(18 posts)
8 years ago

Exercises for Wired Jaw

Hi everyone, I've been in an

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  1. by newreedsyndrome
    (343 posts)

    8 years ago

    Re: Exercises for Wired Jaw

    You can do breathing excersizes. One that a tubist I know does is get a metronome and breath in and out as deep as you can, first in quarter notes, than eigth notes, etc. Also, work on percussion and piano.

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  2. by Azsax
    (47 posts)

    8 years ago

    Re: Exercises for Wired Jaw

    That's a drag. I am sorry to hear that. I would go insane!!!!!!!!!!!!! I don't know if this will work in your condition, but here's my suggestion. Practice pronouncing the sounds "eeee" and "oooo". Over exaggerate your facial muscles when doing so. You should end on the "ooo" with your mouth in the shape like that when drinking froma straw. It really works the muscles. Do it in 5 minutes intervals. I do it in the car driving around town.

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    1. by Sax Mom
      (964 posts)

      8 years ago

      Re: Exercises for Wired Jaw

      Also, try practicing quickening your tonguing technique.

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      1. by newreedsyndrome
        (343 posts)

        8 years ago

        Re: Exercises for Wired Jaw

        And pitch recognition would be good, too.

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    2. by hultingcohen@gmail.com
      (18 posts)

      8 years ago

      Re: Exercises for Wired Jaw

      Thanks very much. Yep, I think this will work, though I am worried about over-extending/contracting my muscles at this point. I am using an 'embouchure tool'--a piece of plastic tubing that you can hold in your mouth while driving, etc., to strengthen the various part of the oral-facial mask (Teal's terms?). Together, these two approaches may work great.

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  3. by The Insomniac Saxman
    (141 posts)

    8 years ago

    Re: Exercises for Wired Jaw

    Sorry to hear about your jaw. To work on finger dexterity and precision, try picking up a Hanon book (first 20 exercises) and working on those at a piano until the wires come off (start at about 60 BPM and gradually work up to 120 BPM as you master the exercises at the slower tempos). If you do this on a regular basis (and I'd recommend doing it daily), you'll notice a huge difference in your time and dexterity when you go back to the saxophone. Best of luck!

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