Saxophone Forum


by WishIWereHere
(8 posts)
9 years ago

legit appropriate??

Is the Yamaha 82z appropriate for legit playing or is it mainly directed towards jazz playing??

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  1. by phathorn
    (165 posts)

    9 years ago

    Re: legit appropriate??

    The player directs the horn, not vice versa

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  2. by connsaxman_jim
    (2336 posts)

    9 years ago

    Re: legit appropriate??

    The 82Z is better suited to jazz, as they are very bright. A Selmer reference of SA III would be better suited for Legit. I'd also look at the Yanigasawa 9933.

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    1. by phathorn
      (165 posts)

      9 years ago

      Re: legit appropriate??

      Let me preface this by saying that I have never personally played the 82z. I have never seen a dramatic change in the timbre of my sound in between modern horns (comparing a Yani to a True-tone, on the other hand would be pretty dramatic). As far as the argument that the 82z is too bright for legit work, the same argument was made regarding the 62 and even the MkVI by some (mostly students of a guy named Sigurd). I would play the horn and see what YOU think.

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      1. by johnsonfromwisconsin
        (767 posts)

        9 years ago

        Re: legit appropriate??

        The 82z is not too "bright" for classical or chamber work. I'm mostly a classical/concert band player and I really like the 82z alto. I've come to the conclusion that a good classical tone needn't abandon all else just to achieve what the player might call 'dark'. A good classical sound can be bright or 'brilliant', but should rather lack edge or buzz and instead focus on achieving a clarity of tone. I think a lot of saxophone players are convinced there is one universal tone legit players should aim for. I disagree with any such notion. I also am finding that equipment counts for less and less as far as achieving a classical tone the more I try to refine my playing. To me a good classical horn should mostly: 1) project well and resonate, thus allowing the horn to respond well at pp 2) have comfortable and silent keywork 3) posess stable registers, respond well, and have no leaks 4) play reasonably in tune

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